Friday, September 4, 2009

NY - State moves dangerous sex offenders

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09/04/2009

By Luke Moretti

Farther away from a Niagara Falls school

NIAGARA FALLS (WIVB) - They're considered some of the most dangerous sex offenders and now, the state is moving them farther away from a Niagara Falls school before classes resume.

Registered sex offenders and schools don't mix, at all.
- How so?  How many sex crimes can you name, that have occurred at a school?

Niagara Falls School Superintendent Cynthia Bianco said, "I didn't think there was that much of a concentration so near one of our schools."

Yet sixteen of them, considered the most serious, had been living at the Midtown Inn in Niagara Falls, much to the surprise of residents.
- Are they really?  What is the address and who are they?  So we can judge for ourselves!

A Niagara Falls resident said, "I'm ashamed of our city."
- Yes, so am I.  Many claim to be Christians, yet are nothing but hypocrites.

And to the Niagara Falls School District, which operates a nearby elementary school on Niagara Street.

Niagara Falls Schools Deputy Superintendent Mark Laurrie said, "That was a bit eye opening for me."

16 sex offenders, listed as level 2 and 3, have now been moved out of the building and placed elsewhere. The New York State Division of Parole which has oversight of the 16 in question, determined that the midtown building violated a city law that bars sex offenders from living within 1500 feet of a school.
- And like California, the sex offender shuffle continues.

New York State Division of Parole spokesperson Heather Groll said, "Of those 16, five of them have violated the conditions of parole and they have been either returned to jail or prison. One has completed their sentence. The other ten are living in various locations throughout Niagara County."

Superintendent Bianco tells News 4 she's pleased that the situation has been resolved only days before the new school year starts, "It's our very youngest children, most vulnerable, who tend to walk through neighborhoods. And that's why it's a concern."
- So why don't parents be parents and either take them to school, or go with them to the bus stop, then this would not be a problem, yet everyone wants Big Brother to protect them, or so they think!

The school district is now forming a task force to help make sure it doesn't happen again. Parents and residents who want to check on where registered sex offenders are living can access computers set-up at schools across the city.

Community activist Candra Thomason, a former Niagara Falls city councilmember who's running again this year, thinks more needs to be done, "Those type of people don't belong in our community, period. And maybe the laws need to be stricter."
- Yep, more political grandstanding, as expected!

The State Senate passed a bill in 2006 that would have required high-risk sex offenders to be housed in secure facilities located in rural areas.
- Basically prison outside of prison!

A state lawmaker from Niagara County tells News 4 that he plans to resurrect a bill passed by the Senate in 2006 that would place high risk sex offenders in a secure setting, rather than back into the community.
- Yeah, of course he is.  He's a politician!

State Senator George Maziarz (Contact) said, "They were actually identified as two state prisons that were slated for closing to house these individuals in a secure facility. That's really what we need."
- See the above picture again!

Video Link


Video Link



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


CA - OMG, a homeless sex offender is around human beings, quick, run to the hills!!!

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09/04/2009

Transients, College Students, Authorities On Edge

BAKERSFIELD - People may usually think of registered sex offenders as listing their locations at a house or an apartment. But one newly released convicted rapist has registered himself as "transient" and that has the community and authorities on edge.

_____ was the talk of the town Friday for the homeless at St. Vincent de Paul.

"Its dangerous because he's allowed to be around homeless people," said transient Yvonne Evans.
- Oh my god, it's a sex offender, around homeless people, we are all doomed!

_____ was recently released from prison after serving time for raping a Sacramento woman at knifepoint. A couple days ago he registered as a transient in Kern County.

"Yeah it's not safe especially for women. I'm scared," said Evans.

Evans isn't the only one concerned-- so are authorities.

"We don't know where he's at. He's only going to be checking in with us every 30 days. So in between him coming in and re-registering with us, we have no way of following up with him or doing any surprise visits of that nature," said Sheriff's Sr. Deputy Michael Whorf.

Even though it is legal for _____ to register as a transient, he must re-register every 30 days and list the address of any home he aquires. Until then, he's roaming the streets.

"He could do something to somebody. He could rape another victim because I'm homeless and I stay in some abandoned homes. I don't stay in shelters. I stay in alleys too and there's people who go up and down alleys, can you image a rapist? I'm scared," said Evans.
- Yes, he could, so could anybody else roaming the streets, yourself included!

Evans is also scared for the prostitutes that roam the streets. But authorities say everyone should be cautious, especially in secluded areas such as parks, bike paths, shopping center parking lots, and college campuses.

"I mean its unsafe. That's what I think. This campus is pretty big and spread out. There's a lot of places for something to happen," said Bakersfield College student Jordan Moser.

Back at St. Vincent de Paul, fears continue to escalate.

"Because some of these shelters have children, there's no telling what he's done before you know what I'm saying?" said Evans.

If you see _____ acting suspiciously or in areas he shouldn't be, give the Sheriff's Office a call at 391-7500


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


Don’t draw the wrong lessons from California predator case

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09/04/2009

By Cynthia Tucker

The awful case of Jaycee Lee Dugard, rescued from a sexual predator after 18 years as his sex slave, is one of those gut-wrenching tales that frightens parents, depresses police officers and energizes lawmakers, who will see an opportunity. Expect politicians at all levels of government, from Congress down to tiny city councils, to seize upon the case to polish their law-and-order credentials.

In the coming months, there’s likely to be a new round of pledges to go after sexual predators and run them out of decent neighborhoods. Look for legislation that imposes fearsome penalties for slight sexual misconduct and adds whole new geographies to the areas where convicted sex offenders may not live, work, eat or breathe.

That impulse, while understandable, ought not to make its way into public policy. Adding offenses and names to the sex registry will make it much more difficult for police to keep an eye on the most dangerous predators.

There are already too many names on sexual offender registries around the country — about 674,000 all told, according to The New York Times. It ought to come as a relief to know that there are not that many vicious perverts of the likes of Philip Garrido, arrested for kidnapping Dugard. (The vast majority of child abductions involve custody disputes; children are usually taken by parents or other relatives.)

But the Garridos infect our memories and invade our nightmares, dredging up our deepest fears about human nature. Every time a case like this comes to dominate the news, public officials make new pledges to protect the public, trying to outdo each other with promises of harsh justice for predators. That has led to sexual registries overburdened with peeping Toms, flashers and foolish adolescents who had sex with a slightly younger teenager.

One of the best known cases of overzealous use of sexual predator laws involved Genarlow Wilson, a young Georgia man who was sentenced to 10 years in prison — and a lifetime on Georgia’s sexual registry — for the crime of consensual oral sex with a 15-year-old girl. Wilson was 17 at the time.

After the Georgia Supreme Court overturned his conviction in 2007, Wilson was finally released from prison after serving nearly three years. When he was initially prosecuted, he had refused a plea deal that would have meant a lesser sentence. Why? Because the deal would have landed him on a sexual offender registry for the rest of his life.

I just don’t feel like I’m a sexual predator,” he said. He wasn’t.

Wilson wasn’t the only Georgian ensnared because of inappropriate — but hardly criminal — behavior as a teenager. But when the Georgia Legislature had the opportunity to correct defects in the law — to narrowly focus the sex registry on dangerous, violent offenders who prey on children — it refused to do so. None of the legislators wanted to be caught with a vote that a rival politician might cast as soft on child molesters. That reluctance to back away from overzealous use of sex offender registries has been repeated around the country, leaving police with far too many names to keep up with.

Law enforcement agencies shouldn’t have to waste valuable time and resources trying to monitor the creeps who drop their britches in public. They’re disgusting, but they’re usually not dangerous. And teenagers who have sex on school property may not get Student of the Year awards. But they shouldn’t be on sex offender registries.

No matter how many or how few names are entered on any registry, there will never be a perfect system for foiling the worst predators. Garrido checked in with his parole officer regularly, according to published reports, and wore a tracking device used to monitor his whereabouts. He still managed to ruin a child’s life after he was paroled on a rape conviction.

Trying to eliminate that kind of evil can make for bad law.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


FL - Sex offender arrested for trespassing at park

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Ron Book, as usual, is full of s---! What recidivism Ron? Did this man commit another sex crime? No, so your stupid argument is worthless!

09/04/2009

MIAMI (WSVN) -- City of Miami Police have arrested a convicted sex offender for trespassing where they say he should not have been.

Officers arrested 22-year-old _____ late Thursday afternoon at a park. Police said they found him there once before.

_____ happens to be one of only two sex offenders named in the ACLU (Contact) lawsuit against Miami-Dade County. The lawsuit deems the county's ordinance forcing convicted sex offenders to live no less than 2500 feet near any place where children congregate unconstitutional.

The ordinance has forced many sex offenders, including _____, to live under the Julia Tuttle Bridge in Miami. The ACLU lawsuit asks the county to lift their ordinance and only stick to the state ban that restricts sex offenders to 1,000 feet.

Thursday afternoon, at about 4 p.m., police spotted _____ at a park located on Northwest Third Avenue and 21st Street in Miami. Police said he was seen circling the area.

His attorney said, _____ used to live in the public housing complex and still has relatives there, who he had been visiting. "He has many acquaintances and many friends here," said Bruce Alter, the suspect's lawyer. "The day of his arrest he had been dropped off at the apartment of his wife's relatives, had visited with them and left the apartment. He was in the complex when he got arrested by police."

Children's advocates, however, think he was up to no good. "I wouldn't be so arrogant as to say I told you so, but we have raised repeated concerns about recidivism rates," said Ron Book, a child safety advocate.
- What recidivism rates Ron?  Show me those stats?  I can show you a ton, here and here.

When police arrested _____, the main charge was trespassing because the park is only for the use of residents living at the apartment building. As a result of his arrest, he has violated his probation, not necessarily for having contact or being within 2500 feet with children, however.

_____ was convicted for having sex with a 15-year-old when he was 19 and served jail time for it. Once released, he said he had no choice but to make his home underneath the Julia Tuttle Bridge because of the county ordinance.

Video Link


Ron Book's Childhood Video (Video Link)



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


CA - Antioch not the sex offender rat's nest that media suggests, data shows

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09/04/2009

By John Simerman

It's a juicy nugget for the worldwide press, tripping alarms on the cable news fear-o-meter.

Anderson Cooper of CNN has the graphics to prove it and a roster of experts to explain how the local area where police say Jaycee Dugard was held in sexual bondage for 18 years has fast become a dense haven for registered sex offenders.

"How Jessica's Law turned Antioch into a paedophile ghetto," splashed a headline Thursday on the Web site of The Independent, a major British newspaper.

Disturbing, if true. Only it's not, according to a Bay Area News Group analysis of sex offender addresses and census data.

News that more than 100 registered sex offenders call Antioch home has sparked a TV news frightfest and stirred worry in local residents. But while the number of registered sex offenders per capita in the city places it above the Bay Area rate of slightly less than one per 1,000 people, Antioch falls well below dozens of other Bay Area communities, and barely cracks the top 10 in Contra Costa County.

Antioch police Chief Jim Hyde took pains to note that the Garrido home sits outside city limits in unincorporated Contra Costa County, which is patrolled by the county sheriff's office. But the city is taking flak from the case, he said, and from what he called "high school journalism" on sex offenders.

"They're mad because they feel their town has been defamed," said Hyde of local residents. Hyde said he has fielded angry calls and e-mails from as far as Germany and England, taking the city to task.

To be sure, the large majority of the 122 registered sex offenders who list the city as their home on the state's Megan's Law online database dwell in the 94509 ZIP code, which encompasses the older housing north of Highway 4. The ZIP code includes the home of Jaycee's accused abductors, Phillip and Nancy Garrido, in unincorporated Antioch, and two other sex offenders who live within a few blocks.

How many people live in the 94509 is not accurately known, because it split into two ZIP codes in 2001, after the last census. But postal service and city estimates suggest that perhaps two-thirds of the city's 102,000 residents live there. If so, the 101 registered sex offenders who call the ZIP code home would rank it 39th in the Bay Area and 15th in the East Bay in sex offenders per capita in ZIP codes with more than 1,000 people.

ZIP codes in Oakland, Richmond, Emeryville, Hayward, San Jose, Gilroy, Vallejo, San Francisco, Redwood City and several other Bay Area ZIP codes exceed it.

The Times analysis also casts doubt on a thicket of speculation that Jessica's Law has fueled a significant migration of Bay Area sex offenders to Antioch's foreclosure-driven stock of cheaper rental housing that sits more than 2,000 feet from a school or park.

The 2006 ballot measure set tough restrictions on where new sex offenders can live the rest of their lives. With little available housing in the urban Bay Area, the thought goes, more outlying cities such as Antioch are seeing a wave of new, undesirable residents in places far from schools and parks.

And they may, say experts, as more sex offenders leave prisons and find fewer and fewer housing options in urban areas. But the restrictions in California don't apply retroactively, meaning registered sex offenders like Garrido, who has remained out of jail since 1993, can stay where they live.

Since early last December, the number of registered sex offenders added to the Megan's Law online database in the 94509 ZIP code has risen by five, from 96 to 101. Maps produced by the state Senate in 2006 show that schools and parks in the city make most of it off-limits to sex offenders who fall under the new law, with patches of legal areas by the freeway and along the Delta.

There are no studies yet to suggest that sex offenders, once off parole, are moving to concentrated areas in response to Jessica's Law, said Suzanne Brown-McBride, chairwoman of the California Sex Offender Management Board. Parolees usually are supervised in the counties where they committed the crime, and fewer than 1,000 sex offenders who fall under Jessica's Law have so far left parole, she said, so few have changed counties because of the law.

"We're still on the cusp of figuring out what the impact will be," said Brown-McBride, who is also executive director of the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault.

The Megan's Law database has grown by about three percent since December, to more than 65,000 names of those living in California communities. For law enforcement, the numbers are overwhelming, said Contra Costa County sheriff's Capt. Daniel Terry. He said about 1,700 registered sex offenders now live in the county — up nearly 50 percent in a decade. About 350 live in unincorporated pockets countywide.

"That's 349 more than detectives I have to monitor these people," said Terry. "And as dangerous as these people are, for every one of them that's been through the criminal justice system, there's a handful that are just as dangerous and haven't been caught yet. We're inundated with sexual assault cases."

A task force including the sheriff's office and local police visited Garrido's house during a July, 2008 sweep to check on compliance — that he lived where he said he did, said Terry. They entered the house and walked through, noticed nothing unusual and left.

"There was no evidence to support any type of foul play or illicit activity that would violate his position as a (Megan's Law) registrant," he said. "Did we go into his backyard and climb the 8-foot wall into the compound that for 17 years nobody knew he was using? No, we did not."

Sheriff Warren Rupf last week apologized, however, for a deputy's weak response to a 911 call in 2006, from a neighbor reporting suspicious circumstances involving young children in the backyard.

The state Attorney General's Office declined to give the Times an updated copy of its Megan's Law database this week. For the analysis, the Times compared current population and sex offender figures for Antioch's two ZIP codes with per-capita rates based on a Dec. 2, 2008 copy of the Megan's Law database and census population data. A bit more than half of registered sex offenders in the database — about 39,000 — list ZIP codes.

Brown-McBride suggested that residents be provided more information on sex offenders in their neighborhoods, and what to do about it.

"It would have been lovely if community members with Garrido had known they could call parole."

One Antioch councilman noted that the situation in the city was more alarming a few years ago, when state parole officials responded to stricter rules for housing sex offenders by putting them up in local motels. State officials said this spring they were suspending a housing program that cost as much as $22 million a year to house paroled sex offenders and keep them from becoming homeless.

"It's not as big a deal as it was when the state was using some motels as staging grounds for folks," said councilman Brian Kalinowski.

"Ninety nine percent of them fly under the radar, paroled into the community, and a very large percentage of them don't have issues," he said. "From my perspective, one individual who's sick in the head doesn't define a community."


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


UT - Police: Ogden kidnapping an elaborate hoax

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09/03/2009

OGDEN -- A judge dismissed charges Thursday against a man who police thought tried to kidnap an 11-year-old girl in Ogden. Prosecutors now say that man was the victim of a scheme planned by his fiancé.

Fifty-one-year-old _____ was charged with attempted kidnapping earlier this week, but now prosecutors say at least three women plotted a scheme to land him in jail. Apparently, his fiancé, 28-year-old Rosalina Urrutia of Clearfield, was the ring leader of the operation.

Weber County District Attorney Dee Smith says he has never seen a case like this.

"They had a wedding date scheduled for later this year. Now whether this was her way of getting out of a marriage she didn't want to participate in, or some other motive, I don't know," Smith said.

Rosalina and her sister, 29-year-old Carmen Urrutia, recruited the 11-year-old and her aunt, Maria Osorio, to participate; they were both paid.

 

"The 11-year-old had been manipulated, bribed, and even some coercion to get her to participate in this," Smith said.

Last Saturday, the woman and the girl were at an Ogden park. Prosecutors say Rosalina told Deleon-Barrios they were meeting at the Days Inn hotel across the street and to give the girl a ride while the other women took separate cars. He did as he was told, and that's when a fourth woman called 911.

"We're not certain as to her knowledge of the scheme, but she was certainly recruited by these individuals, and it was part of the scheme," Smith said

Police arrested the 11-year-old's aunt Thursday afternoon; they're still looking for the two Urrutia sisters.

Prosecutors say the little girl did admit her part in the scheme. At this point, they're not sure if they'll press charges against the 911 caller, but the others could face felony charges, including false reporting and witness tampering.

Video Link



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


SC - Proposed law won't make us safer

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09/04/2009

By ERIC BAERREN

Here is something you probably didn't know - a couple of years ago, a newly elected public official was under threat of recall starting the day after he was elected. Among the reasons given were that he never denied worshipping ancient Sumerian gods and never denied helping South Carolina secede from the Union.

Although there was a flier the organizing group planned to distribute throughout town, the campaign was mostly an Internet phenomenon. There was a blog and also a Facebook group. Both were created using various iterations of his name.

I know all of this because it was a recall campaign of one. Me.

All told, it took about 20 minutes to create the fake e-mail address to register for the fake Facebook account to create the fake Facebook group. That is, except for the flier, which required that I draw a giant diapered robot and Photoshop a picture of his head on top of it (which I got after ambushing him at a social function). It took a bit longer, but it was great fun that came with the side benefit of publicly humiliating a friend of mine.

The Facebook group and account both still exist. I'd delete them, but I'm afraid he may again someday think about public service. If he does, I want to be ready.

On a related note, I read that a group of Michigan lawmakers want to ban sex offenders from using Facebook, Myspace and every other social media site. It's an utterly asinine idea, but don't expect many people to say that.

The problem is that sex offenders today fill a niche once reserved for minority groups. I'm not comparing someone who molests a child to Martin Luther King Jr. I'm saying that they exist as an easy-to-demonize group of people that others can exploit for cheap political advantage. Where once they did that with minorities, today it is safe to do the same with sex offenders. Why? Who wants to come off like they're sticking up for a pedophile?
- Not all sex offenders are pedophiles!

Right now, someone out there is punching numbers on their telephone pad to yell at Sound Off line that I don't care about child rape. My response is, "Quit being stupid." Like many of you, I am a parent. Like many of you, I am as horrified at the thought of child rape as I am of any of the things that keep parents awake at night.

The difference is that when lawmakers say they wish to keep people safe, I expect them to do things that, in fact, keep people safe. When it comes to sex offenders, they are not doing that. Increasingly, they are doing things that exploit people's legitimate concern over sex crime recidivism for the purposes of looking good to the public. We have a word for that - demagoguery.

This last week, a group of lawmakers held a press conference following a sex sting down in Livingston County and called for more and greater restrictions for sex offenders. This includes the Facebook ban.

You may have some clue why I think that legislation is asinine. It is unenforceable. You can create an untraceable identity on the Internet in about 20 minutes. As I said at the start of this column, I know this from direct experience. I did it to embarrass a friend of mine.

The pattern by which we come to this is a familiar one. A crime is committed, and people are arrested. What follows is a press conference at which lawmakers tell us that we need ever more draconian punishments for the guilty. If it isn't forthcoming, then we are all at risk.

No one ever bothers to ask just how some new punishment is supposed to make anyone safer, or how it is supposed to prevent crime. We just go along in this case because no one wants to look like they're sticking up for pedophiles.
- Again, not all sex offenders are pedophiles!

Unfortunately, this proposed law would neither make anyone safer nor would it prevent crimes. Any registered sex offender who has spent more than four hours on the Internet will know how to evade it. The stupid little secret of the Internet is that your identity is precisely what you want it to be for the next five minutes. It is window dressing, offered up not as a real tool to keep us safe, but as an excuse for politicians to look tough whipping on people who can't defend themselves and whom no one will defend.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


MO - Maybe less is more in sex offender lists

View the article here

09/04/2009

By Bill McClellan - ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

A month and a half ago, I wrote a column about a man who had to register as a sex offender because of a misdemeanor child pornography conviction several years ago. Two convictions, actually, but for the same offense. He had downloaded the stuff at work, which was in St. Louis County, and he had taken the computer disc to his home, which was in St. Charles County. So he was charged, and convicted, in both counties.

In both cases, he was given a suspended imposition of sentence, which was supposed to mean that if he successfully completed probation he would have no record. So he got on with his life. He was divorced and had custody of his two children. He married a woman who was divorced and had custody of her two children. In other words, he found himself the head of a melded family of six. He was a former Marine, a college graduate and he had a good job.

Then in August 2004, Missouri amended its laws to require people who had been convicted of possession of child pornography to register as sex offenders.

He registered and life suddenly became complicated. Parents didn't want their children coming to his house. Who could blame them? He was no longer allowed at school functions.

In June 2007, the Missouri Supreme Court ruled that a person who had been convicted of a crime that did not require registration at the time of conviction could not later be required to register. So the man's name was removed from the Missouri Sex Offender Registry.

However, change was coming again, and change in these cases is always one way. The federal Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act required all offenders, regardless of when they were convicted, to register.

In June of this year, the Missouri Supreme Court ruled that the federal law superseded the state law, and the man was required to register again.

That column got a lot of response, almost all of it negative. The great majority of respondents were upset that I seemed so sympathetic toward a man who had possessed child pornography. But a few had similar stories to tell, stories about men who have lived good and decent lives, who have never harmed a child, but who got caught up in pornography and are now classified as sex offenders. Most of them will have to register for the rest of their lives.

Nobody in public life stands up for these guys. Everybody wants to protect the children.

In fact, when the Missouri Supreme Court ruled in June that all sex offenders would be required to register, politicians from both parties expressed their approval. Attorney General Chris Koster (Contact), a Democrat, applauded the decision. So did state Sen. Jason Crowell (Contact), a Republican. "This ruling is a victory for anyone concerned with protecting Missouri's children from sexual predators," Crowell said.

Is it?

I wondered about that when I read the story in Wednesday's newspaper about the state's efforts to keep track of all the sex offenders. The story was prompted by the case in California, in which Phillip Garrido, who had served time for kidnapping and rape, allegedly held Jaycee Dugard in his backyard for 18 years. He was a registered sex offender. How did this case fall through the cracks?

Perhaps it's because of all our efforts to protect children. We're going to watch sex offenders. The lists of these offenders keeps growing. In California, it has doubled since 1994. In Missouri, it has gone from 2,454 at the end of 1995 to 9,279 today.

If we had the money for the increased manpower that the ever-growing list requires, maybe this would make some sense. "To really, truly track these offenders, there needs to be more money and funding available," said Lt. Steve Frisbie of the Missouri Highway Patrol, which maintains the state' sex offender database. But the truth is, no more money is available.

The same thing is true in Illinois. In fact, there was another story in Wednesday's paper about the impending layoffs of almost half the probation workers in Madison County.

So it is everywhere. Funding for public safety resources is shrinking, even as the lists of sex offenders grow.

Perhaps we'd do a better job of protecting children if we narrowed our focus and paid more attention to people like Garrido, people who have a history of violence, rather than watch a population that has done nothing more than look at awful, horrid pictures. That is not meant to justify child pornography. But when it comes to keeping track of sex offenders, maybe less is more.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


FL - Nightline - Living Under A Bridge

Video Link



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


A Message of Hope in the Book of Jonah

Shortly after reading the Book of Jonah in the Bible, a curious viewpoint was revealed to me. Nineveh, the wicked city of 120,000, was to be warned of destruction by the Lord through Jonah. Of course, Jonah did not want to go warn the city of Nineveh because of the slight chance that the Lord’s wrath will be appeased and the Ninevites would be spared. From Jonah’s viewpoint, Israel’s enemies deserved annihilation; however the Lord, who is wiser and all seeing, is the only one to decide whether annihilation is deserving and whether it will be carried out or not.

My thoughts drifted to the viewpoint of John Walsh and other individuals, politicians, etc, who would like all 700,000+ sex offenders banished, imprisoned, or preferably destroyed. As we all know, the ‘sex offender’ is a broad label that encompasses many, regardless of how severe or petty the incident was and regardless of how long it has been since the incident. It is democratic in that it distinguishes all in one big group – dangerous and to be feared by society. It is a fault-ridden label created by cowardly politicians and vindictive fear-mongering advocates.

However, despite the many tirades of John Walsh and his types, the ‘sex offender’ population will not be destroyed. One reason, that as long as the list remains, it will only get larger and burdensome for the taxpayers. The basic law of diminishing returns will insure that. Second, and more importantly, because the Lord knows that not all ‘sex offenders’ are evil incarnate, that many of them should not even be on a list, especially after they have done their time. Moreover, the dangerous child-raping murderer that society fears is not on the list. Why, you ask? Because they are in prison or death-row! They are not mingling in the public. Therefore, despite all the silly ordinances that are created, it will eventually come to pass that sensibility will once again prevail in the land and much of the nonsense will be tossed into the ash heap of bad legislation. How much suffering and burdens will have to be endured between now and that day, I am not sure, but it will eventually get better.

Referring back to Jonah, the Lord didn’t destroy Nineveh because they were willing to seek forgiveness and He graciously forgave them. Many ‘sex offenders’ already know the Lord has forgiven them. Therefore we can take comfort in the fact that John Walsh and his types, like Jonah, will not be granted their wishes for destruction.

-Anonymous


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

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