Wednesday, July 8, 2009

SOSEN - Clustering Brochure

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"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


SOSEN - Adam Walsh Act Brochure

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"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


SOSEN - Banishment Brochure

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"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


NY - Judge Jeanine Pirro - A Sex Offender in defendant's home

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"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


FL - Business Says "No More Prisons"

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Wednesday morning began with 100,552 inmates locked up in Florida prisons. The state also has or will soon have 11 thousand more beds under construction at a cost of almost a billion dollars. As Mike Vasilinda tells us, Floridas major business groups are saying enough is enough.




"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


NJ - Millville repealing sex offender law

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07/08/2009

By JASON LADAY

MILLVILLE - City commission on Tuesday unanimously approved the first step toward repealing its long-suspended sex offender residency restriction law following a New Jersey Supreme Court decision in May striking down local ordinances that attempt to regulate where convicted sex offenders can live once released from incarceration.

According to city Solicitor Richard McCarthy, the N.J. high court had ruled that the state-wide Megan's Law, passed in 1994, is meant to be comprehensive and supersedes local ordinances, including Millville's own.

The ruling affects 120 New Jersey municipalities with laws on the books prohibiting convicted sex offenders from living within a predetermined distance from schools, parks, playgrounds and other places where children congregate.

"The ruling basically states that any local sex offender ordinance that is adopted is pre-empted by Megan's Law, and that local municipalities don't have the right to make their own local laws concerning this," said McCarthy.

Later, McCarthy stated many of the local ordinances across the state were similar and specifically addressed places where convicted sex offenders could not enter.

"Ours was very similar to other municipal sex offender laws, in that it dealt with geographical residences," he said. "But, the court ruled that Megan's law is supposed to be comprehensive."

The city had opted two years ago to suspend its local sex offender ordinance after the case left the appellate court stage and had been referred to the state Supreme Court. Now, the commission is following the recommendations of its legal team in repealing the ordinance altogether.

"It's now the recommendation of lawyers in general that we repeal to law to fall in line with the court decision and that's what we're doing here," said McCarthy.

The ordinance goes to second reading at the commission's next meeting. The change would take effect on July 21, according to city officials.

Megan's Law is named after 7-year-old Megan Kanka, of Hamilton, who was kidnapped, raped and killed by a neighbor, a repeat sex offender, who had previously been released from prison. Other states, as well as the federal government, have since passed their own versions of Megan's Law.

The law requires convicted sex offenders to register with police after their released from incarceration and to notify authorities if they move. The past offender's entire neighborhood is advised if he or she is deemed most dangerous.


"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


IN - Ex-sex offender hopeful after residency ruling

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07/08/2009

By SOPHIA VORAVONG

Two summers ago, nearly 30 Tippecanoe County sex offenders who had victimized children received hand-delivered letters stating that they had to move or else be criminally charged with a Class D felony.

The letters were in response to a statute, passed in 2006, prohibiting such sex offenders from living within 1,000 feet of a school, public park or youth program center.

That decision has cost _____ of Lafayette, a three-time convicted child molester, an estimated $11,000 in motel costs.

"I know the public believes, 'Once a child molester, always a child molester,' " he said. "But I'm not the same person today. ... This law has emotionally and financially drained me."

But under a recent ruling by the Indiana Supreme Court, _____ and other offenders convicted before the law was enacted on July 1, 2006, could soon return home.

The 5-0 decision found that the residency restriction violated the Indiana Constitution by retroactively punishing _____, a Blackford County man who died in December.

_____ had owned his home for about 10 years when he was convicted in 1997 of a sex offense against a child. In January 2007, he was charged with violating the new residency law.

A Blackford County judge dismissed the charge as unconstitutional, and it was upheld by the Indiana Court of Appeals. The state's Supreme Court agreed.

"This is a substantial housing disadvantage," Justice Robert D. Rucker wrote.

"... A sex offender is subject to constant eviction because there is no way for him or her to find a permanent home in that there are no guarantees a school or youth program center will not open within 1,000 feet of any given location."

Tippecanoe County Sheriff Tracy Brown, whose agency maintains the county's Sex and Violent Offender Registry, said he plans to confer with Prosecutor Pat Harrington on the ruling.

Harrington said his office is looking into the potential trickle-down effect of _____'s case.

"We will review the decision and follow its mandate," he said. "That could mean re-evaulating how the law is enforced in Tippecanoe County."


"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


2020 - Age of Consent Videos

The original account I had with these videos, was deleted, and I've uploaded a couple again.

YouTube Play List | Age of Consent Website



"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


OK - Couple Bury Dead Girl,11, Then Dig Her Up And Move

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An Oklahoma couple are accused of burying an 11-year-old girl, digging up her remains and moving the body from state to state for more than a year.

Abel Wolf, 35, and Denise Wolf, 40, were being held without bail Tuesday in Havre, charged with tampering with or fabricating physical evidence.

A spokeswoman for the Oklahoma Bureau of Investigation, Jessica Brown, says relatives told police in Oklahoma that the couple's 11-year-old daughter, Cheyenne, was missing, after the Wolfs began a string of moves through Montana and Oregon.

Police discovered the remains in a storage unit used by the couple in the Milton-Freewater area in Oregon.

Based on signed affidavits by two people, Brown says the remains are Cheyenne's.




"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


NY - Court throws out Rensselaer County sex offender residency law

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"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)