Thursday, July 2, 2009

FL - Sex offender murdered, $1,000 reward

View the article here

07/02/2009

A Tampa Bay registered sex offender was murdered on June 13, 2009. Crime Stoppers is offering a $1,000 reward for any information that leads to the identification and arrest of the suspects. _____ was 54 years old when his body was located near N. Elmore and E. Adalee Street in Tampa. Under the Jessica Lunsford Act, sex offenders whose victims were under the age of 12 are required to wear lifetime GPS monitoring. _____ had been wearing a GPS tracking device, in fact, it was the GPS that alerted police to the location of his body.

A report from a witness states that _____ had exited a light colored vehicle that had been occupied by four suspects whose identity are yet unknown. The witness saw one of the suspects strike _____ in the head with an unidentified object. Another suspect shot _____ in the chest and leg.

The Tampa Police Department was able to trace _____’s events that night through his GPS tracking device. Due to reports based upon the GPS, _____ was in Ybor City between the hours of 7:40 p.m. and 3:00 a.m. June 12-June 13, 2009. The GPS system monitored _____’s movements until he was in the vicinity of E. Palm Avenue and N. 10th Street. It is believed that the suspects picked up _____ in that area.

Descriptions of the suspects are as follows:

The first suspect is described as a black male, about 6'2" with long dreadlocks in hair. He appeared to be in his early thirties. Black male, 6`2", long dreads, early thirties. The second suspect was a black male with short hair. He appeared to be in his early twenties. The third suspect was a black male who stood about 5'7" with bushy dreadlocks. The vehicle's driver, the fourth suspect, was possibly a black female.

The suspect’s vehicle is described as being a cream colored, late eighties to early nineties Oldsmobile or Buick, four-door model.

The suspect’s vehicle is described as being a cream colored, late eighties to early nineties Oldsmobile or Buick, four-door model. If you have any information regarding the identity of the suspects or there whereabouts you are asked to contact Crime Stoppers To be eligible for the $1,000 reward call 1-800-873-TIPS (8477). You may also report anonymously online or by texting “CTSB”, as well as your information to CRIMES (2737)


"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


ARC RADIO - SPECIAL SHOW/SPECIAL NIGHT/SPECIAL TIME RON BOOK FROM FLORIDA (07/02/2009)

Hosted by: RealityUSA

Title: SPECIAL SHOW/SPECIAL NIGHT/SPECIAL TIME RON BOOK FROM FLORIDA

Time: 07/02/2009 08:30 PM EST

Episode Notes: Join us on TUESDAY NIGHT special show at 8:30pm est. Where are guest will be Ron Book who is a Miami attorney and lobbyist from Florida. In 2004, in one of Mr. Book's proudest moments, he was awarded the Alvah Chapman Humanitarian of the Year Award for his 12 years of service to the homeless in Miami-Dade County. We at this time are excepting emails from all with questions that we will ask on the show that night. Please keep the questions decent/proper and please have respect to the guest as we hear his side of the issue. Email your questions to americansrealitycheck@gmail.com

Sites Mentioned:






American’s Reality Check - July 2, 2009 - 8:30 p.m. Eastern

Dial: 724-444-7444
Code: 29521
Chat: http://www.talkshoe.com/talkshoe/web/talkCast.jsp?masterId=29521&cmd=tc

Please join us this coming Thursday, during a special time and date, as we here at American’s Reality Check (ARC) welcome Ron Book to a special guest appearance on the ARC show.

Ron Book is a prominent Miami attorney and lobbyist, who’s campaigning with his daughter Lauren to have National loitering laws which would keep former registered sex offenders three hundred (300) feet from child safety zones which would include schools, parks, day cares, school bus stops and other places children congregate.

Some of Ron’s accomplishment s include:

1: An award of the Alvah - Chapman Humanitarian of the Year Award for his 12 years of service to the homeless in Miami-Dade County in 2004.

2: He is President and a Founding member of Laurens Kids, a organization which his daughter, a victim of sexual abuse, educates children and adults about sexual predators. Laurens kids (www.laurenskids.org) holds educational seminars and workshops will help create more awareness about sexual abuse laws, offer legal counsel and offer guidance on how and where to file complaints.

In recent weeks, as many of our listeners know, S.O.S.E.N. visited Dade County, Florida to film a documentary on the Julia Tuttle Causeway and Dade County’s 2,500 foot residency ordinance which forces former registered sex offenders to live under a bridge many dubbed the “Bridge of Tyranny”. Some feel this is a violation of Human and Civil Rights and yet others feel it protects children from sexual abuse.

S.O.S.E.N. contacted Ron so their documentary could discuss both sides of the issue so the public is informed and educated. Ron graciously agreed to discuss his side of the issue for the documentary and unfortunately our schedules did not coincide to meet in person.

However, tonight, we thank Ron for joining us as we hope to find common ground regarding these issues which is Florida’s focal point as it draws attention from the International world.

So please join us as ARC interviews Ron Book as we delve into residency and loitering laws and hear both sides of a issue which has much debate and controversy.

Warm Regards,

ARC Hosts,

Kevin and Mary (rickysmom)
http://www.americansrealitycheck.com


"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


SOSEN - July 2009 News letter

Click the image to view the PDF document

You can also see more news letters and brochures here.



"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


DE - Lawmakers pass sex offense bills

View the article here

07/02/2009

Two bills cleared the General Assembly on Tuesday that extend protection for children who are sexually assaulted.

House Bill 136, sponsored by Rep. E. Bradford "Brad" Bennett (Email), D-Dover South, increases penalties for registered sex offenders who commit a sex offense against a child under 12 years of age. If the offender is charged with a misdemeanor sex crime, the additional penalty would be a class C felony, which carries a sentence of up to 15 years. If the offender is charged with a class C, D, E, F or G felony, the enhanced penalty would be a class B felony, which carries a sentence of two to 25 years. HB 136, which passed the House unanimously in April, passed the Senate unanimously.

Both chambers also unanimously passed House Bill 206, sponsored by Bennett. The bill increases the penalties for the crime of "sex offender unlawful sexual conduct against a child" when the victim is under 18 and has a cognitive disability. It also amends the definition of "without consent" to help protect those with cognitive disabilities.


"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


FL - Homeless sex offenders creating problems

View the article here
See this item on "A Voice of Reason"

07/02/2009

MIAMI - About 80 men say they call Miami's Julia Tuttle Causeway home because a Miami-Dade law restricts where people convicted of sex crimes with minors can live.

The men told The Palm Peach (Fla.) Post the ordinance has made it nearly impossible for them to find legal living quarters because it prohibits them from living within 2,500 feet of schools, playgrounds, or, in some instances, school bus stops.

Before Miami-Dade adopted the ordinance in 2005, state law applied, which required offenders live at least 1,000 feet away from such sites.

"Terrorists, members of al-Qaida, live better at Guantanamo (Bay, Cuba, military prison) than we do," said Armando Martinez, 49, convicted for attempted sexual battery against a child.

About 100 Florida cities expanded their buffer zones and state officials fear the "homeless sex offender" problem will spread, the Post reported Thursday.

Acknowledging that the men won't generate public sympathy, Howard Simon, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, said people must understand that living under an overpass creates "a more dangerous situation."

"Because of the conditions, some of these individuals are absconding, evading supervision," Simon said. "These ordinances interfere with the Department of Corrections ability to keep track of them. This is a crisis situation."

Florida Department of Corrections spokesperson Gretl Plessinger, said she agreed with Simon's assessment.

"Our concern is for public safety," Plessinger told the Post. "If they are homeless there is more of a chance they will abscond."


"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


Who Should Be Tracked?

View the article here

07/02/2009

By Harriette Halepis

Using GPS tracking systems to track criminals has been widespread lately. Various states have adopted policies that include the tracking of criminals, while other states are not too quick to implement GPS tracking technology.

While it seems as though the types of criminals that are forced to wear tracking devices varies from area to area, sex offenders and domestic abusers are generally pinpointed. This selectivity has caused a great deal of public anger. Further, it has prompted many different people to point towards other types of offenders that should be tracked in lieu of sex offenders and domestic violence offenders.

The question is: who should be tracked? What kind of criminal should be followed for the rest of their life, while other criminals are left undisturbed? Is the sex offender or domestic abuser any less of a threat to society than someone that has been convicted of drug smuggling or murder?

What about the accusations that tracking criminals via GPS is against human rights? Some might argue that convicted criminals lost their right to basic human rights when they violated the rights of their victims. Others may state that all humans living in a society have the right to basic necessities (food, water, shelter), but what about the right to be reintegrated into society without being tracked regularly?

Then there’s the practical side of the human rights debate – it’s just not possible to track every single criminal on the face of the planet. Even if it were possible, who would pay for all of that tracking technology?

Some states are now requiring criminals to pay for their own tracking devices (about $8 per day). Other states are setting up entire police tracking teams that exist solely to track criminals all day (and night) long.
These are some possibilities, but until a concrete solution to these tracking problems can be found, the logical thing to do is narrow down the list of criminals by selecting who should, and shouldn’t be tracked. How does a state or government go about creating such a list?

Perhaps our society should simply put into practice that age-old Exodus saying: “an eye for an eye.” Murderers might be best served by being murdered, and sex offenders may be punished by experiencing their own crimes – then again, “an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind” (Mahatma Ghandi).

Or, maybe we could resort to Ancient Greek and Roman standards by exiling criminals to distant locations. Execution seemed to work just fine for Henry VIII (who didn’t discriminate between murderers, gypsies, or petty thieves). Even our present society keeps “track” of criminals through the usage of parole officers and “check-ins.”

In the end, selecting the types of criminals that should be tracked via GPS is a near impossibility. While all criminals cannot be tracked, those that can be tracked should be. Why? Our society does not stone people to death, we do not take an “eye for an eye,” and we do not mutilate criminals.

Instead, we simply slap a GPS tracking device on those that pose the biggest threat to our society. In the end, the GPS tracking solution seems to be the easiest — and most humane — way of keeping an eye on criminals that has ever been invented.
- I disagree!  If someone is so dangerous, that they need to be tracked, then why were they not sentenced to a longer time in prison?  Someone who is so dangerous, do you really think they care about a GPS device?  If they want to commit a crime, they will!


"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)


This is what goes on in the Louisiana Legislature



And Elsewhere



"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (Bill Of Rights)