Wednesday, May 27, 2009

NY - Email sent in by a reader in response to "NY - A call to punish sex offenders using social Web sites"

Keep up the good work, and don't let anybody discourage you from speaking out.  Many want us to remain silent, but we must NOT be silent anymore.  If all RSO's did this, then we'd be making a HUGE dent!  Also, the author of this article may want to join SOSEN and other forums, as well as some of the others.

After reading the article, "NY - A call to punish sex offenders using social Web sites" ...I called the Legislator who proposed it. His office is right around the corner from probation. After failed attempts of reaching him by phone, I decided to pay him a visit and was able to talk to him briefly for 5 minutes in an empty conference room with his aid taking notes. This ocurred after the press conference stated in the article.

I am a level one and he said the law would only effect level 2 and 3. He said the law is not retroactive as that would violate ex post facto. I said, "yeah well, other laws have violated it and still passed like Adam Walsh." He had no reply. I got emotional and said, "You people are killing me... I feel like eveyone wants me to die." He said, "That's not true." I asked him if he realized that not all sex offenders are the same. He said, "I know but there are people who are classified as level ones but are really level two and three." I said, "I know but what I hate is that all sex offenders are lumped together and I am not someone who goes around doing things." I told him my story, in summary, of how I was abused as a child, blocked it out for 20 years and wanted my childhood back which led to my arrest for having pictures. He seemed to understand and said, "Based on what you've told me, you may be an exception." But he also said that sex offenders have a very high recidivism rate. I told him that's not true. He moved his head back as if to say, "Oh, c'mon" ...an equivalent of an eye roll (Maybe you should point him to these studies). I said, "If you look at the state research and other states, recidivism is actually very low. I am sure that there are offenses that don't get reported but I am not doing those things... you people are killing me." He had no further comment on that. He said he sees leadership in me but said if I wanted to change things, I can't do it alone. He again stated that I may be an exception (to what he believes a sex offender is). He referred me to the Coalition Against Child Abuse where my voice can be heard through them as advocates to Legislators. I talked to someone there but felt lost... like anything I said was not going to get to its intended audience. I preferred my direct approach... going right to the source. I think I was too emotional and probably could have articulated better but it was my first time doing that and I'm surprised I got to speak with him. I asked him bluntly, uncontrollably letting my emotions do the talking, "Do you think about these things before you make laws?" He said confidently, "Yes."
- You should've then asked him, "What all is in the bill then?" and also pointed him or handed him the recidivism studies, from the Bureau of Justice and other sources.  You can also download this ZIP file, which contains many recidivism studies, which you can then print out, or burn to the CD to hand to them.  I also have more recidivism studies here.

I will be keeping an eye on him as he also supported the local residency restrictions. His office then called probation and asked that I be checked up on to see if I was okay. I talked to my PO and I said I am okay. She told me something I didn't know... that I could put my case up for review to the board to remove me from the registry after my probation is over in 2.5 years from now (4 years before I was originally supposed to get off and 14 years before the state retroactively changed it). Time will tell.


PA - 'Abducted' Mom, Daughter Found in Florida

View the article here

05/27/2009

By RICHARD ESPOSITO, JAY SHAYLOR and EMILY FRIEDMAN

Woman, 9-Year-Old Girl Flew From Philadelphia to Orlando, Visited Disney World, Cops Say

A Pennsylvania woman who vanished after calling 911 to say she had been abducted and stuffed in the trunk of a car along with her young daughter apparently faked the abduction, booked a flight to Orlando, where she checked into a hotel under an alias and then took her daughter to visit a Disney theme park, law enforcement sources told ABC News.

Bonnie Sweeten, 38, and her 9-year-old _____, were located at Disney World and were expected to be returned to Philadelphia as early as Thursday, law enforcement officials said.

Sweeten and her daughter disappeared Tuesday. She was last heard from about 1:45 p.m. when she called 911 to say she had been in a minor car accident in Bucks County, a Philadelphia suburb. She called a second time moments later to say she had been tossed in the trunk of a Cadillac by two black men, according to police.

As the investigation developed, investigators became increasingly skeptical of her abduction tale which was told against the backdrop of a probe into Sweeten's alleged involvement in the theft of about $300,000, sources close to the investigation told ABC News.

Sweeten also had recently told a friend, investigators said, that she was feeling suicidal. Investigators say friends and relatives noted she was scared in the days prior to her disappearance.

One of the first pieces of information that called her version of events into doubt was the fact that cell phone records indicated that Sweeten's frantic call to 911 dispatchers reporting her kidnapping in Bucks County originated from a location in Philadelphia's Center City neighborhood, and not from a suburb 25 miles away where she lived.

The airport video allegedly showed her boarding a plane for Orlando about 3 p.m., a little more than an hour after she reported being abducted, sources told WVPI.

Law enforcement officials told ABC News that the team of federal and local investigators involved in the Sweeten disappearance were looking into allegations that Sweeten may have taken about $300,000 from her former employer, an attorney in Upper Makefield Township.

FBI Special Agent J.J. Klaver told ABCNews.com that authorities are "following any and all leads."

"We have a 9-year-old girl and her mother missing and finding them is our priority," Klaver said. "This is still an ongoing and rapidly moving criminal investigation."

Authorities had been searching suburbs in Bucks County as well as motels in the Philadelphia area in an effort to locate Sweeten and her daughter. That hunt has now extended to Florida.

Sweeten and _____ had been missing since Tuesday afternoon when the SUV they were driving was reportedly rear-ended at a Bucks County intersection. Sweeten called 911 shortly before 2 p.m. to report the accident, but when authorities arrived at the scene, there was nobody there.

A short time later, Sweeten made another call to 911 to say that she and her daughter had been abducted, with the mother forced into the trunk of a black Cadillac operated by two black men who had rear-ended her vehicle and kidnapped her when she got out to exchange insurance information.

Police traced the cell phone call to an area in downtown Philadelphia approximately 20 miles from the supposed crash scene. A black Cadillac with front-end damage was located by police, but the FBI later said the car is not linked to the abduction.

An Amber Alert was issued for _____, who was described as 59 pounds, 4 feet 1 inches tall with long brown hair and a dime-sized birthmark on her forehead.

Early today police discovered Sweeten's silver GMC Yukon Denali, which they reported finding unlocked, without keys and with a parking ticket on its windshield in Center City, an area of downtown Philadelphia that is well-known for its bustling restaurants and shops.

Sweeten, a mother of three children, has an 8-month-old baby with her husband, _____. They live in Feasterville, Pa. Police in the suburb where Sweeten lives indicated that family members are known to them.

ABCNews.com was unable to reach _____, Sweeten's ex-husband with whom she had two children: _____, 15, and _____, 9.

On NBC's "Today" show today, _____ said that he did not know why anyone would abduct his ex-wife and daughter.

"I have no clue," said _____, who said he has maintained a good relationship with Sweeten since their divorce.

_____ said that Sweeten was known for being "very organized" and that his daughter was "always dancing around the house" and "loved sports."


WI - City Council postpones adopting sexual offender residency restrictions

View the article here

05/27/2009

By Randy Hanson

On second thought, a majority of Hudson City Council members decided that a proposed ordinance restricting where convicted sex offenders can live in the city was too onerous.

The council at its May 18 meeting rejected final approval of the “Restricted Zones and Residence Restrictions for Sex Offenders” ordinance that it had given first-reading approval to at its previous meeting.

Four alderpersons – Scot O’Malley, Lee Wyland, Lori Bernard and Pam Brokaw – voted against adopting the ordinance. Alderpersons Randy Morrissette II and Alan Burchill voted for it.

There was no objection by council members to prohibiting violent sexual offenders and those convicted of offenses against children from being at or near places frequented by children.

The proposed ordinance would prohibit offenders from being on those properties or loitering within 150 feet of specified properties. The properties would include schools, parks, public libraries, daycare centers and youth centers.

But a majority of council members were reticent to adopt an ordinance banning offenders from living within 250 feet of the restricted places.

Alderperson Scot O’Malley argued that the restriction would put too much of Hudson’s rental property off limits to sex offenders. O’Malley said they would quit reporting where they were living to authorities.

The council’s Public Safety Committee on Tuesday morning discussed revising the sex offender residency restrictions.

The committee’s agenda included:
  1. Splitting the ordinance in two;
  2. Creating a map showing the restricted residences at 200-foot distances;
  3. Including the multi-family property on both the 250- and 200-foot maps;
  4. Including the “rental” properties on both the 250-foot and 200-foot map; and
  5. Drafting a list of “exempt” zones in which sexual offenders could reside despite the proximity to a protected area such as Lakefront Park.


CANADA - Stepdad cleared of abuse, can see kids again

View the article here

05/27/2009

By SAM PAZZANO

Estranged wife hired hitman to kill him

A Toronto man -- whose estranged wife hired a hitman to kill him -- was cleared of allegations he molested his stepdaughter.

The 40-year-old man who wept on the witness stand while describing the anguish of being estranged from his children was acquitted by Justice Silja Seppi, who found his evidence "resonates as truth."

The Brampton judge decided the mother was not a credible witness, noting she "manipulates facts" and tried to have the accused killed after their separation.

The judge also found that the child may have been coached to testify against her stepdad.

The judge said the timing of her mother's report to the police about the sexual assaults, "coming as it did in the heat of a high-conflict matrimonial separation," is relevant.

"She was clearly determined to punish the accused by whatever means at her disposal as evidenced by her plan to have him killed," the judge said in the judgment released last week.

"The mother was also the benefactor of his being charged, as he was then removed from the matrimonial home, allowing her to return with the children free of his presence."

The hitman, who admitted hating the accused, testified the girl told him she "would tell the police whatever her mother and father told her to say about the stepfather," Seppi said. His evidence was "firm and convincing."

The hitman said the girl was being used as a pawn in the family court battle and he believed the mom was motivated by her hatred against the accused for their bitter breakup, not for the alleged sexual abuse.

The judge said the girl, now 11, "was also visibly and verbally reluctant when she talked about the stepdad sexually assaulting her" and was rarely specific.

"Her reluctance and lack of detail could be a manifestation of having been coached on what to say, and being at a loss, when asked about matters beyond what had been coached."

The girl corroborated to the judge the videotaped statements she made to police in 2005 and '06 of mostly genital rubbing, which allegedly occurred when she was six to seven years old.

A publication ban prevents naming the girl or anyone who may lead to her being identified.

Last year, the girl's mother, now 31, pleaded guilty to planning the November 2005 hit against the accused molester -- which she later cancelled.

The mother of four was given a stay-at-home sentence of nine months and probation. She was in jail for six weeks in '06 until she made bail.
- Wow, another woman, another slap on the wrist, IMO.


DC - Supreme Court rules police can initiate suspect's questioning (Which violates Miranda Rights!!)

View the article here

Yet one more right eradicated by the corrupt government!

05/26/2009

By James Vicini

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court (Contact) ruled on Tuesday that police, under certain circumstances, can initiate an interrogation of a suspect without the defendant's lawyer being present.
- Well, people can always plead the fifth, and say nothing...

By a 5-4 vote, the conservative majority overruled a 23-year-old Supreme Court decision that barred the police from initiating questioning after a defendant asserted the right to an attorney at an arraignment or similar proceeding.

The 1986 decision held that once a defendant invoked the right to counsel, only the suspect, and not the police, can initiate the contact.

The ruling was the latest in a recent string by conservative justices expanding the power of police to question suspects, but it does not change the landmark 1966 ruling barring the police from questioning a suspect who invoked the right to remain silent or have a lawyer present.

The decision was a defeat for Jesse Jay Montejo, a Louisiana death row inmate. He was convicted and sentenced to death for the murder of a dry-cleaning operator during a robbery in 2002.

He initially waived his right to a lawyer and was questioned by the police. He told several conflicting stories. Several days later, he appeared in court for a preliminary hearing and a local judge appointed a lawyer to represent Montejo, who could not afford an attorney.

Later that day, police investigators approached Montejo in prison and he again waived his right to a lawyer.

But Montejo later claimed the police had violated his constitutional right to counsel by interrogating him without his lawyer being present and pressuring him to write a letter confessing and apologizing to the victim's wife. That letter was later introduced as evidence against him at his trial.

The Louisiana Supreme Court and then the U.S. Supreme Court rejected Montejo's appeal.

Writing for the court majority, Justice Antonin Scalia said there was little if any chance a defendant will be badgered into waiving the right to have counsel present during police-initiated questioning.

In overruling the 1986 decision, Scalia said, "The considerable adverse effect of this rule upon society's ability to solve crimes and bring criminals to justice far outweighs its capacity to prevent a genuinely coerced agreement to speak without counsel present."

Liberal Justice John Paul Stevens, the author of the 1986 decision, disagreed.

In dissent, Stevens said the dubious benefits of overruling the decision are far outweighed by damage to the rule of law and the integrity of the constitutional right to an attorney.

InfoWarrior.com
(Part 1)


(Part 2 - Coming soon)



UK - Are there women paedophiles?

View the article here

04/29/2009

By Tom Geoghegan - BBC News Magazine

Paedophiles are invariably thought of as men and they mostly are. But do women commit sexual abuse against children, and if so, why is it rarely discussed?

Colin never knew innocence as a child. His earliest memories are of his mother sexually abusing him. In the bath, in his bed and in the night. Until he was 13.

Twenty years later, after a young life derailed by truancy, drugs and violence, he is still deeply affected by what he says happened.

"It's only now that I realise the impact it has had on me. From the age of 14, as soon as it got dark I would have panic attacks and that fuelled my drug-taking because doing it, I felt safe again."

"I couldn't sleep at night and I'd get flashbacks of my mum on top of me. I couldn't hold down a job and I was scared of girls."

The fact the perpetrator was the person who gave birth to him made it harder for him to identify and accept it as abuse, he believes.

"I found it hard to even say it was sexual abuse because of the way society views mothers, and quite rightly - 99% are loving but I was just unlucky to get one that wasn't."

"That's what stopped me from getting help for a long time. I couldn't even acknowledge it myself and there was a worry about being believed and speaking out against my mother. I felt like I was doing something wrong."

It's a comment on how society views paedophilia today that the most shocking aspect of Colin's story is not the sexual abuse itself, but the fact the perpetrator was female.

Yet Colin is not alone in experiencing this particular kind of trauma, says Steve Bevan, who for nearly two decades has run a support group for male victims of all forms of sexual abuse. Out of 18 men currently getting individual and group support, five say they were abused by women, three of them exclusively so.

"Over the years we've had lots of men abused by mothers, sisters, aunties and baby sitters," says Mr Bevan.

"It's hard enough for adult men to admit abuse but to admit to abuse by a woman is even harder because it challenges their masculinity, it challenges their sexuality."

Women can commit a wide range of sexual offences, he says, including rape. And their victims commonly experience sexual confusion and a fear of intimacy. Anger can manifest itself as violence towards a wife or girlfriend in later life.

By its very nature the true picture of child abuse is unclear. But with women perpetrators it's even more so. Convictions are thin on the ground and some believe the issue is an unhelpful distraction from the bigger problem.

Experts agree that women commit only a fraction of child sexual abuse but so much is hidden that it's difficult to be accurate. An influential study in the US in the 1980s suggested 20% of all offences against boys and 5% against girls were by women.

'Teen fantasy'

Professor Kevin Browne, who has been researching the maltreatment of children for 30 years, says between 5% and 10% of abuse against pre-pubescent children in the UK is committed by females, but only about 5% is thought to involve a woman acting alone.

"Stranger attacks by women hardly exist, so most female paedophiles are winning the trust of children first and either have a position of care working with children like a babysitter or they are a relative."

Female offences against teenagers (hebophiles rather than paedophiles) are more of a mystery, he says, because victims don't come forward, partly because in a patriarchal society boys are even expected to enjoy that kind of abuse, and not admit how scared they are by it.

Some believe that society's different attitude to women offenders is reflected in the language of the media reporting it. They point out that teachers "seduce" pupils if they are female but "sexually assault" if male.

In 2005, the NSPCC raised concerns about how disbelief of female paedophiles was hindering detection. Its report said child protection professionals too often met allegations of abuse by females with incredulity, dismissing them as fabrication and allowing women to continue to offend.

It also said that victims suffered a peculiar sense of isolation and stigma because this form of abuse was not so widely recognised.

Eight-hundred victims of female sexual abuse have contacted Michele Elliott, founder of children's charity Kidscape, since she wrote her controversial book, Female Sexual Abuse of Children, in 1992. Three-quarters of the cases feature women acting alone.

"One of the issues of controversy is the thinking that if women do this, it's because men made them do it," says Ms Elliot.

"I disagree with that. I think there's no difference in the motivation between men and women, which is sexual gratification and power over a child. It's very selfish."

Like male paedophiles, many female offenders convince themselves they are not harming children, says psychologist Sharon Lambert who this month presented her research on the subject to the British Psychological Society's annual conference.

She contacted a number of people through a website specifically aimed at women. There were no indecent images posted but there were stories and poems about their sexual fantasies with children and a forum for women to discuss their feelings and how they could avoid detection.

"They would say they're not as bad as men because they're more loving with their impulses, and a male involved with a child is more abusive."

'Under the radar'

She began correspondence with six people who claimed to be women aged from 21 to 48. They all described themselves as heterosexual and five claimed to be married. They all said they fantasised about young girls but said they had not actually abused any.

"We can't be certain about the connection between sexual fantasies and actual offending. Some adults who fantasise about children may never offend but we can't be sure they won't act out their fantasies."

They all admitted their first sexual experiences came very early in life, aged about seven or eight, with other children their own age. They said they had never been abused themselves.

"There are things you can do as a woman that you can't do as a man," says Ms Lambert. "If I was still bathing my 11-year-old son, people would think that was weird but if a man was doing that then people are more likely to think it was sexual abuse. Women go under the radar."

Unlike Ms Lambert's studies, some perpetrators seem also to be victims. Colin's mother told him she was a victim of sexual abuse from her father, sometimes describing it to him in detail moments before indecently assaulting him.

"Maybe I reminded her of her dad and she felt like she was getting back at him, taking back some control that way, by taking it out on me," says Colin.


UK - Female Sex Offenders Escape Detection Due to Sexism

View the article here

05/27/2009

By Rob

Inaccurate sexist stereotypes encourage the public to be skeptical of claims of females abusing children. Further, they cause suspicion of men committing child abuse even when they have done nothing abusive. This enables more easy acceptance of female cover stories for child abuse. Yet despite popular misconception, child abuse is not primarily a crime committed by males.

Statistics are very clear that women are actually more abusive against children than men. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) statistics show that of children abused by parents, about 70% of child abuse and child murders are committed by mothers and 30% by fathers.

In particular, females committing sexual abuse against children seems to be very difficult for the general population to accept. This is a tragedy as it frequently enables female sex offenders to continue their abuse for years against children in their care. The children frequently end up with life-long psychological damage. They seldom talk of the abuse at the hands of their mothers or other female caregivers because they know nobody will believe them. Even those who report being raped or sexually assaulted by a female are often laughed at by police. There is a double-standard at work in which sexual assault and abuse committed by adult females on boys is “seduction” and somehow desirable by boys:

(from Are there women paedophiles?)

Female offences against teenagers (hebophiles rather than paedophiles) are more of a mystery, he says, because victims don’t come forward, partly because in a patriarchal society boys are even expected to enjoy that kind of abuse, and not admit how scared they are by it.

Some believe that society’s different attitude to women offenders is reflected in the language of the media reporting it. They point out that teachers “seduce” pupils if they are female but “sexually assault” if male.

In 2005, the NSPCC raised concerns about how disbelief of female paedophiles was hindering detection. Its report said child protection professionals too often met allegations of abuse by females with incredulity, dismissing them as fabrication and allowing women to continue to offend.

Our recent article Canadian Mother Webcasts Self and Toddler Bestiality with Dog discusses one maternal child sex abuse case about which Canadian authorities are expressing amazement. They should not be so amazed. Beyond the DHHS statistics showing females commit most child abuse, some research indicates about 1/3 of male rapists and child sex offenders were sexually abused by females. In support groups for male sexual abuse survivors, it is not unusual to find that 1/4 to 1/3 of victims were sexually abused by females. Such victims find it hard to even discuss what was done to them because others find it so hard to believe a female could be a sex offender:

(from Are there women paedophiles?)

Yet Colin is not alone in experiencing this particular kind of trauma, says Steve Bevan, who for nearly two decades has run a support group for male victims of all forms of sexual abuse. Out of 18 men currently getting individual and group support, five say they were abused by women, three of them exclusively so.

Over the years we’ve had lots of men abused by mothers, sisters, aunties and baby sitters,” says Mr. Bevan.

It’s hard enough for adult men to admit abuse but to admit to abuse by a woman is even harder because it challenges their masculinity, it challenges their sexuality.”

Women can commit a wide range of sexual offences, he says, including rape. And their victims commonly experience sexual confusion and a fear of intimacy. Anger can manifest itself as violence towards a wife or girlfriend in later life.

Often these sexually abusive females cover up after themselves very effectively because they occupy child care provider roles, from mothers to nannies to babysitters to housekeepers. They have extensive unrestricted and unsupervised access to minor children and can confuse the children into participating in sexually abusive acts by gradually winning their trust or love. Gaining the emotional closeness of trust of children before starting to abuse them is the common modus operandi of female sex offenders. In part, this may be because they delude themselves into believing they are performing loving acts towards the children they abuse. They may believe being sexual with children is a maternal and loving behavior, perhaps due to being sexually abused themselves as children.

(from Are there women paedophiles?)

Eight-hundred victims of female sexual abuse have contacted Michele Elliott, founder of children’s charity Kidscape, since she wrote her controversial book, Female Sexual Abuse of Children, in 1992. Three-quarters of the cases feature women acting alone.

One of the issues of controversy is the thinking that if women do this, it’s because men made them do it,” says Ms. Elliot.

I disagree with that. I think there’s no difference in the motivation between men and women, which is sexual gratification and power over a child. It’s very selfish.”

Ending child abuse requires acknowledging that women are responsible for a large portion of it and holding them accountable for their crimes. Without this change in attitude and action, even if all child abuse by males were to end, the majority of child abuse would continue.

Further Reading

Female Sex Offenders: What Therapists, Law Enforcement and Child Protective Services Need to Know

For everyone responsible for the well being of children, this book explains one of the hardest to detect threats to their safety.

Female sex offenders have victimized an estimated two to three million people in the United States. As a society we find it nearly impossible to believe that females, usually seen as nurturing, are capable of sexual abuse.

The result is that, each year, hundreds of thousands of youth are not protected, not believed, and not treated for the trauma associated with the abuse. Through her detailed analysis of the currently available literature and her own research, Dr. Hislop describes what is known about female sex offenders: identification of abusers, estimates of the number of abusers and victims, the methods of abuse, the types of trauma seen among their victims, and what is known about the developmental histories of female sex offenders.

She also provides therapists with directions for treatment and prioritized treatment goals, including exploring the victimization and patterns of offending, the relationship between the offender’s own victimization and her offending, precursors to offending, and methods to stop offending.


NY - A call to punish sex offenders using social Web sites

View the article here

This is a pointless law. Those on probation/parole can already be prohibited from being on social networks or the Internet, and if they violate that order, they go back to prison. But once again, IMO, this is just for votes and so the person who made the law can look "tough" on crime, but nothing more.

05/27/2009

By WILLIAM MURPHY

A Nassau County legislator plans to propose legislation Wednesday that would send sexual predators back to prison if they are caught going on social networking Web sites.

Facebook and MySpace have already agreed to block some 25,000 registered sex offenders listed on a state database, according to state Attorney General Andrew Cuomo (Contact), who drafted the law passed last May that created the database.
- Just because a sex offender is using a social networking site, doesn't mean they are out trolling for some kid to molest.  But, discrimination and further punishment based on a label is all it's about, punishment, and looking good to the sheeple.

"State law puts the onus on the site operators, this puts the onus on the probation department and the probationer," Legis. David Mejias (Contact) (D-Farmingdale) said Tuesday.

Mejias said he would be joined at a news conference Wednesday by supporters of his proposal, including Nassau County police and probation officials and Laura Ahearn, executive director of Parents for Megan's Law.
- Of course he will, he needs many people around him, so he can toot his own horn and "look good" to the people!

"My bill would make it a violation of probation if they are caught going on these sites," Mejias said. He said violators would be sent back to prison to complete their original prison sentence.
- Why not just leave it up to the probation/parol department to set these guidelines?  Oh yeah, you got to do this to "look good" to the people, I forgot!


WI - Public a no-show at sex offender meeting

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Apparently the public is not interested as the media portrays. And you will also notice, the man being released, has his own little Gestapo bodyguard to follow him around.

05/27/2009

By Sarah Millard

MANITOWOC — Manitowoc County law enforcement attempted to share information about a convicted sex offender's release into the community, but local citizens did not attend the meeting at the Manitowoc Police Department Tuesday evening.

Still, members from the police department and the Department of Corrections spoke with the Herald Times Reporter about _____, 28, who will move to _____ in Manitowoc on Thursday.

The neighborhood is familiar with sex offenders, as the residence is used for transitional placement. Sex offenders live in the house until they find jobs and housing elsewhere, said Kevin Mueller, corrections field supervisor.

"Ideally, there would be permanent housing when they come out of prison, but that is not the case," Manitowoc Police Chief Tony Dick said.

Including _____, there are 181 registered sex offenders in Manitowoc County, according to the Sex Offender Registry.

_____ has four convictions for sexually assaulting children — three in Manitowoc County and one in Shawano County. He was eligible for parole in 2006 but remained in prison until the full term was served on the Shawano County case.

_____ was sentenced to 20 years of probation on the Manitowoc County cases. If he violates probation on the cases, he faces additional prison time, Mueller said.

_____ will be monitored through a Global Positioning System. His probation agent will escort _____ when he leaves the house for the first several weeks.

"We basically can watch him while he travels," Mueller said.

Additionally, he is to have no contact with his victims or anyone younger than 18. _____ is not allowed to go where children congregate — movie theaters, malls, parks and the skating rink — unless he has his agent's permission and a designated chaperone.


CA - Parolees in camp must find another place to stay

View the article here

05/27/2009

By SCOTT JASON

Sex offenders argue their options are limited.

The paroled sex offenders living alongside Black Rascal Creek must move elsewhere by Friday or face arrest, a state corrections official said Monday.

"We're not ignorant in the sense that the problem of the transient population will go away," Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation unit supervisor David Domico said. "We do have an obligation to enforce parole restrictions and the law."

The parolees can't live on private property. They knew the day would come when they'd have to find somewhere else to stay, Domico said.

Homeless advocates argue that a lack of suitable housing means there's no option for them but to go back to prison. The department's move may scatter the population, they add, possibly creating more safety issues because the sex offenders would be living alone without the support of one another.

The number of sex offenders at the encampment west of Merced changes every day. It represents a small percentage of the total homeless population.

Nonetheless, it's one of the thornier social and legal issues facing the city because of the strict restrictions about where the parolees can live.

About a dozen paroled sex offenders are living there now, though there are also homeless who aren't serving out parole. They're not being asked to move because the department doesn't supervise them.

It's up to the landowner to complain about the trespassing. As it stands, there's some confusion about whether the camps fall on land owned by Merced Irrigation District or Union Pacific.

The decision to evict the paroled sex offenders follows a meeting last week with Sen. Jeff Denham (Contact), R-Merced, and Assemblywoman Cathleen Galgiani (Contact), D-Stockton, that was requested by Merced Mayor Ellie Wooten and Merced County Supervisor Mike Nelson.

The local leaders called the state senator's office because the problem falls within state control, Denham spokeswoman Jann Taber said. "(Denham) believes if these paroled sex offenders do anything that violates their parole they should be arrested," she said.
- How smart of you!

By noon Thursday, the parolees must tell their agents where they plan to live, according to a letter given to them.

If they can't find anywhere to go, Domico explained, they'll be held accountable, which includes going back to prison. "If that's what it takes, that's what it takes," he said.
- So the states very laws force these people into homelessness.  The average homeless person can live near the creek, but because they are sex offenders, they are being forced to move, and if they cannot find a new place to stay, they go to prison.  How pathetic!  The state created the problem, and they are solving nothing.  But, they are achieving their ultimate goal, to lock up sex offenders, that is obvious!

Their options are limited. Restrictions put on sex offenders, such as living within 2,000 feet from parks and schools, effectively keep them out of the city. The Merced County Rescue Mission, the D Street shelter and local churches are also off-limits.

Jesse, a homeless sex offender, didn't want his last name used because he feared he'd be targeted.

He was convicted on a charge of oral copulation after a stint at a youth corrections complex in 1981. Cornered, he thought he was going to be raped by a couple other juveniles.

He went on the offensive, dropping his pants and yanking the boy's head to his crotch, he recalled, and yelling a verbal command at the 15-year-old.

Another crime -- drunken driving in 2001 -- violated his parole and forced him to register as a sex offender.
- What?  He did not have to register, but because of a violation he does?  If he did not have to register in the first place, why would a violation cause him to have to register?

His parole is set to end in March. He isn't sure where he'll live next week. There's a spot near Highway 99 that he thinks may work. "We're pretty heartbroken," he said. "We don't know where to go."

Homeless advocates, since learning of the plans, have been busy trying to stop the plan. A call was put into the American Civil Liberties Union for help.

Renee Davenport, who lobbies for local homeless people, said she called top officials with state parole.

"It's just crazy," she said. "They have nowhere to go."
- And this, IMO, proves that the state doesn't want offenders to be anywhere except prison!

And they've got till Friday to go there.