Saturday, November 22, 2008

OH - Do residency restrictions protect children from sex offenders?

View the article here

11/23/2008

By Megan Gildow and Emanuel Cavallaro - Staff Writers

Springfield - Bans prohibiting registered sex offenders from living near places where children gather are in more than 30 states, but are running into challenges over whether they do any good.

A ban that prevents a sex offender from living within 1,000 feet of those schools, parks and day care centers doesn't prevent them from standing across the street from them.

"If they're living within 1,000 feet of a school, the opportunity to interact with children definitely increases," said Clark County Sheriff's Deputy Michael Young, former Electronic Sex-offender Registry Notification (ESORN) officer with the Clark County Sheriff's Office. "But at the same time, living within 1,000 feet of a school — that's all it affects — where they live."

At least 30 states have passed restrictions similar to the one in Ohio. They ban sex offenders from living within anywhere from 500 to 2,500 feet of a child care or educational facility.

There's little research on the effect of sex offender residency restrictions, according to the American Psychology Association.

The only benefit shown by the few studies that have been done is a quicker arrest time for subsequent offenses, according to a 2006 report to the Ohio Criminal Sentencing Commission.

The housing instability created by residency restrictions may actually make some sex offenders more likely to re-offend, according to some studies.

A study in Orange County, Fla., found that 95 percent of all residences in the community were within 1,000 feet of a "child-dense" area, leaving few places for sex offenders to legally reside.

Residency restrictions have sometimes come with unintended effects.

After a sex offender residency restriction went into effect in Iowa, the number of unaccounted sex offenders in the state doubled, according to the Iowa Coalition Against Sexual Assault.

A representative from CASA spoke to legislators in 2005 about the group's concerns about the impact of Iowa's 2,000-foot residency restrictions. The restrictions destabilized employment opportunities for sex offenders and research has shown that steady employment and a stable lifestyle improve the chances that the sex offender will not re-offend, according to CASA.

Opponents of residency restrictions argue that the policy is self-defeating. The restrictions make it difficult to keep track of offenders, the argument goes, because they discourage offenders from registering.

The recent popularity of sex offender residency restrictions stem from belief that there is a high re-offense rate for sex offenders, that strangers commit most sex crimes and treatment does not work for sex offenders, according to a 2005 study by psychologist Jill S. Levinson.

Studies of imprisoned sex-offenders have shown that, when it comes to an offender's choice of victim, the determining factor is not where the offender lives, but whom the offender knows.

Research conducted in 2005 for the Ohio Criminal Sentencing Commission found that in 93 percent of sex-offences involving child victims, the offender knew the victim.

"Sexual offending is not a crime of proximity; it's a crime of relationships," said Margie Slagle, an attorney with the Cincinnati-based Ohio Justice & Policy Center, which litigated the issue in the Ohio Supreme Court.

"(These laws) provide a very false sense of security for parents," she sad.

In Clark County, sex offenders register their addresses with the Clark County Sheriff's Office. He enters their new address into a computer system; if the address is within 1,000 feet of a school, the system alerts him and he tells the sex offender they cannot move there.

Schools have little to do with the monitoring of where sex offenders live in relation to their buildings because it is a police matter. However parents sometimes call because they are concerned about a sex offender living in the neighborhood.

Often, those calls go to the transportation department, said Carolyn White, transportation director for Springfield City Schools.

Although there is no law against it, the district tries to move bus stops so they are not by a sex offender's home, she said.

"In the city it is so hard because it seems like there's one on every corner," White said. "There's just some areas that it just seems like it's more heavily populated in some areas."

In some cases, parents arrange to take turns waiting with the children or walking them to the bus stop, she said.

In Clark County, at least 18 sex offenders live within 1,000 feet of a school under an exemption that allows offenders who moved to their home or committed their crime prior to the law's creation to live within the restricted area. There are two in Champaign County who live within the 1,000-foot limit.

There are nearly 300 registered sex offenders living in Clark County and about 110 in Champaign County, according to the office of the Ohio Attorney General.


OH - Do residency restrictions protect children from sex offenders?

View the article here

11/23/2008

By Megan Gildow and Emanuel Cavallaro - Staff Writers

Springfield - Bans prohibiting registered sex offenders from living near places where children gather are in more than 30 states, but are running into challenges over whether they do any good.

A ban that prevents a sex offender from living within 1,000 feet of those schools, parks and day care centers doesn't prevent them from standing across the street from them.

"If they're living within 1,000 feet of a school, the opportunity to interact with children definitely increases," said Clark County Sheriff's Deputy Michael Young, former Electronic Sex-offender Registry Notification (ESORN) officer with the Clark County Sheriff's Office. "But at the same time, living within 1,000 feet of a school — that's all it affects — where they live."

At least 30 states have passed restrictions similar to the one in Ohio. They ban sex offenders from living within anywhere from 500 to 2,500 feet of a child care or educational facility.

There's little research on the effect of sex offender residency restrictions, according to the American Psychology Association.

The only benefit shown by the few studies that have been done is a quicker arrest time for subsequent offenses, according to a 2006 report to the Ohio Criminal Sentencing Commission.

The housing instability created by residency restrictions may actually make some sex offenders more likely to re-offend, according to some studies.

A study in Orange County, Fla., found that 95 percent of all residences in the community were within 1,000 feet of a "child-dense" area, leaving few places for sex offenders to legally reside.

Residency restrictions have sometimes come with unintended effects.

After a sex offender residency restriction went into effect in Iowa, the number of unaccounted sex offenders in the state doubled, according to the Iowa Coalition Against Sexual Assault.

A representative from CASA spoke to legislators in 2005 about the group's concerns about the impact of Iowa's 2,000-foot residency restrictions. The restrictions destabilized employment opportunities for sex offenders and research has shown that steady employment and a stable lifestyle improve the chances that the sex offender will not re-offend, according to CASA.

Opponents of residency restrictions argue that the policy is self-defeating. The restrictions make it difficult to keep track of offenders, the argument goes, because they discourage offenders from registering.

The recent popularity of sex offender residency restrictions stem from belief that there is a high re-offense rate for sex offenders, that strangers commit most sex crimes and treatment does not work for sex offenders, according to a 2005 study by psychologist Jill S. Levinson.

Studies of imprisoned sex-offenders have shown that, when it comes to an offender's choice of victim, the determining factor is not where the offender lives, but whom the offender knows.

Research conducted in 2005 for the Ohio Criminal Sentencing Commission found that in 93 percent of sex-offences involving child victims, the offender knew the victim.

"Sexual offending is not a crime of proximity; it's a crime of relationships," said Margie Slagle, an attorney with the Cincinnati-based Ohio Justice & Policy Center, which litigated the issue in the Ohio Supreme Court.

"(These laws) provide a very false sense of security for parents," she sad.

In Clark County, sex offenders register their addresses with the Clark County Sheriff's Office. He enters their new address into a computer system; if the address is within 1,000 feet of a school, the system alerts him and he tells the sex offender they cannot move there.

Schools have little to do with the monitoring of where sex offenders live in relation to their buildings because it is a police matter. However parents sometimes call because they are concerned about a sex offender living in the neighborhood.

Often, those calls go to the transportation department, said Carolyn White, transportation director for Springfield City Schools.

Although there is no law against it, the district tries to move bus stops so they are not by a sex offender's home, she said.

"In the city it is so hard because it seems like there's one on every corner," White said. "There's just some areas that it just seems like it's more heavily populated in some areas."

In some cases, parents arrange to take turns waiting with the children or walking them to the bus stop, she said.

In Clark County, at least 18 sex offenders live within 1,000 feet of a school under an exemption that allows offenders who moved to their home or committed their crime prior to the law's creation to live within the restricted area. There are two in Champaign County who live within the 1,000-foot limit.

There are nearly 300 registered sex offenders living in Clark County and about 110 in Champaign County, according to the office of the Ohio Attorney General.


UK - Man killed himself after paedophile allegation

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11/21/2008

By Ali Cridland

A man wrongly accused of being a paedophile suffocated himself at home.

William Chandler, who was known as Bill, placed a plastic bag over his head after police were told he was grooming a young boy for sex.

But an inquest in Brighton was told detectives could find no evidence the 31-year-old had behaved in any improper way with the youngster.

A coroner suggested Mr Chandler had killed himself because he could not cope with the false allegations.

He was found dead at his flat in Eaton Gardens, Hove, on September 1.

Days earlier police had received a complaint from the boy’s father about online computer messages exchanged between his son and Mr Chandler.

A police investigation concluded there had been no offence committed and no sexual grooming had taken place.

The police had been handed 12 pages of transcripts of online conversations between the boy and Mr Chandler, which took place on August 25 and 26.

Detective Sergeant Vanessa Britton, of Sussex Police, told the inquest: “In my opinion it is a conversation between a curious young male and a role model he can trust.”

Mr Chandler, who worked for the Learning and Skills Council, was found after police were alerted by his worried family who had not been able to contact him and he had failed to turn up at work.

He had suffered from depression in the past and had left a suicide note addressed to his mother. The contents of the note were not read out at the hearing but the inquest heard the note did not mention the allegations about the boy.

Mr Chandler, a music lover, was described as a kind and cheerful man by his friends and family.

Dr Karen Henderson, Brighton and Hove’s assistant deputy coroner, said she concurred completely with the police report that there had been absolutely no evidence of any sexual grooming or paedophile activity.

She said he had been accused of something that is “every man’s nightmare”. Dr Henderson added: “Once accused it is so difficult to refute. There is no suggestion that his relationship with the boy was anything but loving and caring.

“I am sure he was a very fine and upstanding member of the community.”

She recorded a verdict that Mr Chandler took his own life.


OH - LIFE AS A SEX OFFENDER

View the article here

11/23/2008

By Emanuel Cavallaro - Staff Writer

New Carlisle - A registered sex offender, he committed his crime 10 years ago. Now he has a wife and three kids.

Being a registered sex offender has cost him jobs and made finding employment difficult. He and his wife say that their kids are teased at school, and other parents are wary of letting their owns kids play with their children or stay overnight at their house.

The man and his wife agreed to speak with the News-Sun in return for their names be withheld from the article. They fear that they or their children might be harassed.

"I don't want or need that kind of attention," the man said.

According to court records and interviews, the man was convicted of third-degree sexual assault on a 14-year-old girl in a case out of Wyoming in 2000. He was given a suspended prison sentence of one to three years. His probation was revoked after he was brought up on a breach of peace charge and after police witnessed a girl under 18 getting into his truck in a high school parking lot.

He then served 18 months in prison. He has been out ever since, but has had difficulty adjusting to life as a registered sex offender.

"(After I get a job) there will be a phone-call saying "There's a sex offender working for you,' and I get fired just like that," he said. "People automatically think the worst."
- Sounds like the BS Perverted-Justice and the other vigilante mob squad does (harassment).

In July, his neighbor hung two signs in a front window alerting the neighborhood that he had, "raped a 14 year old girl in Wyoming who was under the influence of alcohol at the time."

The neighbor then filed a civil suit against him, seeking injunctive relief on the grounds that he was violating Ohio law by living within 1,000 feet of a school.

In fact, two registered sex offenders live within 1,000 feet of New Carlisle Elementary School. He is one of them, but he committed his offense before July 31, 2003, the date Ohio's residency restrictions for sex offenders went into effect. A ruling by the Ohio Supreme Court this year determined that offenders who moved to their homes or committed their offenses before July 31, 2003, aren't bound by the restrictions.

State Rep. Jimmy Stewart (Email), R-Athens, wants to change that. In August he introduced House Bill 607, which would effectively make the residency restrictions retroactive.
- More stomping on the Constitution, and violating his "oath of office," which he swore to God he would uphold.  Making something retroactive, violates the Constitution.

"As long as they are registered sex offenders, they are still quote unquote 'paying their debt to society,' " Stewart said. "This is one of the most heinous crimes."
- So teens having consensual sex is "the most heinous crime?"  Like all the other ignorant, grandstanding politicians, you clearly assume everyone is a pedophile, and do not know what you are talking about, just trying to "look good" to the sheeple!  Get a life!

The way his bill is written, the restrictions would apply to all sex offenders in the state, regardless of when they committed their offenses or when they moved into their homes. That would mean that some offenders now in compliance would have to look for a new place to live.

This November, Stewart won a race for a state Senate seat. He said he expected there to be hearings on the bill this month after the state legislature reconvenes or later on in December.

In the meantime, the neighbor said he has no plans to take his signs down. Neither will he so much as speak to the sex offender. "I haven't talked to him," the neighbor said in a phone interview. "I don't intend to."
- The sex offender should sue for harassment!

Margie Slagle, an attorney with the Cincinnati-based Ohio Justice & Policy Center, which litigated the residency restrictions issue in the Ohio Supreme Court, is now representing the sex offender. In September, she filed a motion to dismiss the civil suit.

Though she isn't opposed to all sex offender registry notification legislation, she believes residency restrictions have the potential to endanger the public. They can isolate offenders and sever their ties to support systems.

"Studies on recidivism show a huge correlation between employment, family support, housing and re-offending," she said. "They're coming back into the community. Why are we putting up barriers that prevent them from succeeding?"
- Because, they want an offender to reoffend, so it justifies all the BS they are spewing, and prison is a business!

Last month, in response to Slagle's motion to dismiss, the neighbor filed a motion for a stay, pending the outcome of House Bill 607.

Contact this reporter at (937) 328-0367 or ecavallaro@coxohio.com.


AMERICA’S TOP 53 POLITICAL SEX SCANDALS

View the article here | Here as well

And how many of these, who had sex with underage kids, can you find on the sex offender registry?

Click the images to view, or view the original PDF above



Rob Lowe - Sex tape controversy

View the article here

Funny how the average Joe can say the same thing, and they are thrown in prison, yet when a celebrity or high profile person does the same, they are basically set free.

In 1988, Lowe was involved in a sex scandal over a videotape of him having sex with two females, one of whom was sixteen, in Atlanta while attending the 1988 Democratic National Convention. Lowe has asserted that he did not know that the second girl was underage, and it was confirmed that the two had met at a bar, which the girl entered by lying about her age.

Another part of the same tape was leaked at the time, showing Lowe, a young American model named Jennifer, and Justin Morris having a ménage à trois in a hotel room in Paris. This part of the original tape was sold as one of the first commercially available celebrity sex tapes, damaging his public image. He later entered a rehabilitation clinic for alcohol and sex addiction. Eventually, his career rebounded and Lowe mocked his own behavior during two post-scandal appearances as host of Saturday Night Live.


Fighting Porn Through Jesus Christ

By me posting this here, doesn't mean I agree with everything said. But it may help some folks out there, who may be struggling with this issue.


CA - Charges filed in trailer park killing

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11/21/2008

By Adam Madison - Triplicate staff writer

A Chico man was charged with murder Thursday after a Crescent City man was fatally stabbed Wednesday night at the Shangri-La Trailer Court, 1130 U.S. Hwy. 101 North.

Mario Contreras Garcia, 21, is in custody at the Del Norte County Jail, charged with the murder of Terry Eugene Maddon, 39, said the Del Norte County Sheriff's Office Thursday. Garcia is being held without bail.

A second defendant, Guillermo Montanez, 20, of Crescent City, is in jail on suspicion of being an accessory to the murder and is being held on $500,000 bail.

Authorities were called to the trailer park at about 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. By then, Maddon had been taken by ambulance to Sutter Coast Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

"Basically we got a call that he had been transported to the hospital by ambulance and had been stabbed," said sheriff's Detective Ed Fleshman.

Maddon was stabbed once in the area to the left of his armpit.

"It was an altercation between (Maddon and) two Mexican males and one female," said Fleshman.

As investigators continued to search the scene, two people were taken into custody. They were eventually released, said Fleshman, but not before authorities were able to get information on the suspects.

"Because of that they uncovered some very good leads for us," said Detective Sergeant Steve Morris.

Early Thursday, hours after the stabbing, Del Norte Search and Rescue workers found Mario Garcia "hiding behind a trailer in the back of the park," Fleshman said.

Garcia's sister, Maricruz Garcia, was also questioned and released.

Fleshman did not release details of a possible motive in the killing of Maddon, a registered sex offender.

Morris said that the suspected murder weapon, a lock-back folding knife was also found.

"It was located in a storage shed in the trailer park," said the sergeant.

Maddon had lived with his mother, Georgie Maddon, 57, at the trailer park, said the Sheriff's Office. Georgie Maddon was named on the lease, which began in December 2007, but her son was not, authorities said.

Maddon had been convicted of sexually abusing a minor under 14.
- Ok, so does this justify a murder?

Morris said the office is awaiting forensic tests on evidence from the knife and from Mario Garcia's clothing.

The sergeant said authorities are investigating other suspects in the case as well.


S.O.S.E.N. News Letter for October 2008

Click the image to download/view the PDF document


WI - Probation ordered in beating of sex offender

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Yet more proof the public registry needs to be taken offline, like it was when it was not a HIT-LIST!  How many people must be beaten or killed before the corrupt government sees this?

11/22/2008

APPLETON — A 22-year-old Appleton man, who attacked another man because he was a registered sex offender, was placed on probation Friday for 18 months.
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Outagamie County Circuit Judge Dee Dyer imposed and stayed a one-year jail sentence for David T. Starkey, who was convicted of disorderly conduct and bail jumping.

At a Nov. 5 jury trial, Starkey was found not guilty of the more serious charge of substantial battery but was found guilty on the misdemeanor charges.
- Why?  We should be setting an example.  This rampant vigilantism needs to be stopped, and by taking the registry offline, would be a major start!

"I am really sorry for everything that happened," Starkey said.

Starkey beat a 33-year-old Appleton man on Aug. 30, 2007. Starkey had targeted the victim because of his status as a registered sex offender, according to the criminal complaint.

The victim required hospitalization for treatment of extensive facial injuries and lost teeth.


CA - Documents: Big gaps in tracking sex offenders

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Just goes to show you, GPS is not all it's worked up to be.  It's just a placebo the TAX PAYERS are paying for, and like I've said a million times, even if someone is wearing GPS, if they were intent on committing another crime, they would, regardless.  So this is just tax payer dollars being sucked down the drain!

11/21/2008

By Keith Eldridge

The state Department of Corrections has 'lost track' of some homeless sex offenders it monitors by satellite - sometimes for days at a time, KOMO News has learned.

About 100 homeless sex offenders in Washington state are monitored using global positioning satellite bracelets that they wear.

The satellite technology is designed to keep track of these sex offenders 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. But the system is not working.

For hours - even days - at a time, some sex offenders disappear, only to reappear later. And there's no telling what happened in the meantime.

Tim Gaynor of Tacoma has document after document which show huge gaps in sex offender tracking.

He discovered the gaps while trying to track the whereabouts of homeless sex offender Leon Harshman. Gaynor was investigating an alleged theft.

But Harshman's GPS tracking device lost its satellite connection practically every day - and so did the GPS positions of three other sex offenders in the documents.

"So my question is: What good are these GPS bracelets?" Gaynor says. "I mean, it's a false sense of security."
- It's good for sucking up tax payer dollars, and is a placebo to make people "feel safe," and nothing more.  If a person is truly intent on committing another crime, they will do so, period!  Why don't we investigate who has stocks in the GPS market?  I bet we'd find a lot of public officials pushing the GPS devices!  And if so, they are getting rich, from using fear to scare people into voting for GPS, when it does nothing to protect anyone!

Anna Aylward at the Department of Corrections admits there are gaps - sometimes big ones. But she contends the system was never meant to be foolproof.
- But it's misleading the public into believing it's 100% perfect, when it is not, and that is deception!

"This mechanism is an adjunct, it is an add-on to supervision," she says. "It certainly is not prevention. It certainly is not 100 percent."

She says the technology cannot guarantee perfect monitoring.

But, she insists it's a big step forward from the old system, when officials never knew where homeless sex offenders were.
- Why do you need to know where they are?  If they have done their time, and have been let out of prison, then you have no right to make them wear GPS.  It's just more prison outside of prison.

The state also points out that it's only allowed to track 100 homeless sex offenders with GPS.

Meanwhile, there are 15,000 sex offenders who register with a home address and aren't tracked at all.
- Why should they be? Why don't we monitor murderers, gang members, drug dealers, etc?


CT - Misdemeanor Plea Ends Norwich Pornography Case

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I think this is insane. Why should she have to plead to anything, when the IT department should be held accountable for the pop-ups? She simply turned on a machine to teach kids, and tons of popup porn pictures came up, which she could not stop. Apparently the computer was infected with a virus, spyware or adware. I think if anyone should loose their job, it should be the incompetent IT department, not this teacher.  I am glad she is able to get on with her life now, and not in prison for 40 years, but I think making her plead to anything is just wrong!

11/22/2008

By RICK GREEN - The Hartford Courant

Almost 18 months after a pornography conviction that could have sent her to jail for 40 years was thrown out, former Norwich substitute teacher Julie Amero (Her Blog) plead guilty to a single charge of disorderly conduct Friday afternoon.

The plea deal before Superior Court Judge Robert E. Young in Norwich ends a long-running drama that attracted attention from around the world.

"Oh honey, it's over. I feel wonderful," Amero said a few minutes after pleading guilty to disorderly conduct and agreeing to surrender her teaching license. She had originally been charged with 10 counts of risk of injury to a minor and later convicted on four of them.

"The Norwich police made a mistake. It was proven. That makes me feel like I'm on top of the world."

In June of 2007, Judge Hillary B. Strackbein tossed out Amero's conviction on charges that she intentionally caused a stream of "pop-up" pornography on the computer in her classroom and allowed students to view it.

Confronted with evidence compiled by forensic computer experts, Strackbein ordered a new trial, saying the conviction was based on "erroneous" and "false information."

Friday, New London County State's Attorney Michael Regan said the state was prepared to go to trial again, but because of Amero's ill health agreed to the reduce the felony charges to a single misdemeanor.

"I have no regrets. Things took a course that was unplanned," Regan said. "For some reason, this case caught the media's attention."