Monday, September 1, 2008

IL - Sexual assault myth of the month

View the article here

09/02/2008

Gail Trimpe-Morrow, M.S., L.P.C., Coordinator, Sexual Assault Prevention and Survivor Services

Myth: Most rapes or sexual assaults are committed by strangers.

Fact: Over 80 percent of sexual assaults are committed by someone the victim knows. On the ISU campus over 85 percent of sexual assaults are committed by an acquaintance.
The most common perception of a sexual predator is the "stranger lurking in the dark." As children, we are all cautioned about "stranger danger" and learn about "good touches and bad touches." We are warned not to walk alone at night, to be wary of strangers and to stick to well-lit paths. These safeguards, though good advice, provide us with a false sense of safety and reinforce the idea that if we are cautious enough we can prevent bad things from happening.

There is no doubt we can reduce the risk of violence, but prevention lies in the hands of those who commit such acts. We exercise caution with the unkempt stranger, but we don't exercise the same caution when interacting or partying with acquaintances.

If the number of acquaintance rapes is so high, why do we continue to visualize the rapist as a stranger? The "myth" of the stranger rapist is perpetuated by the media - we see the stranger rapist scenario on TV and in the movies, and we are more likely to read about a stranger rape in the newspaper or hear it on the news. It is easier to think about the stranger as the perpetrator of violence. It is very frightening to think about people we know being capable of sexual violence.

The reality is familiar people and places are more dangerous. The greatest risk of a sexual assault is from someone you know - someone you met at a party, a friend, a date, a partner - not a stranger. Sexual assaults occurring on-campus are most likely to occur in the residence halls.

Although the incidence of acquaintance rape is high, there are ways to decrease the risk. These strategies apply to both men and women in the context of any relationship or encounter.

Sex without consent is rape. Make sure you have sober consent for any sexual activity. Consent cannot be given when drunk. If you choose to use alcohol, know your limit and stick to it. Risk for an unwanted sexual experience is increased with the excessive use of alcohol. Go out in groups and return in groups; do not leave friends behind or allow them to wander off with someone they just met.

If you see someone putting themselves at risk or making a poor choice - say something, actively intervene or find someone who will. Do not wait for others to act. It is likely others are having the same thoughts and concerns as you.

If you or someone you know has been the victim of an unwanted sexual experience, talk to someone. Ignoring it will not make it go away. Help is free and confidential. Contact the Sexual Assault Prevention and Survivor Services program in Student Counseling Services at 438-7948 or 438-3566, or visit the website at counseling.ilstu.edu.


IL - Sexual assault myth of the month

View the article here

09/02/2008

Gail Trimpe-Morrow, M.S., L.P.C., Coordinator, Sexual Assault Prevention and Survivor Services

Myth: Most rapes or sexual assaults are committed by strangers.

Fact: Over 80 percent of sexual assaults are committed by someone the victim knows. On the ISU campus over 85 percent of sexual assaults are committed by an acquaintance.
The most common perception of a sexual predator is the "stranger lurking in the dark." As children, we are all cautioned about "stranger danger" and learn about "good touches and bad touches." We are warned not to walk alone at night, to be wary of strangers and to stick to well-lit paths. These safeguards, though good advice, provide us with a false sense of safety and reinforce the idea that if we are cautious enough we can prevent bad things from happening.

There is no doubt we can reduce the risk of violence, but prevention lies in the hands of those who commit such acts. We exercise caution with the unkempt stranger, but we don't exercise the same caution when interacting or partying with acquaintances.

If the number of acquaintance rapes is so high, why do we continue to visualize the rapist as a stranger? The "myth" of the stranger rapist is perpetuated by the media - we see the stranger rapist scenario on TV and in the movies, and we are more likely to read about a stranger rape in the newspaper or hear it on the news. It is easier to think about the stranger as the perpetrator of violence. It is very frightening to think about people we know being capable of sexual violence.

The reality is familiar people and places are more dangerous. The greatest risk of a sexual assault is from someone you know - someone you met at a party, a friend, a date, a partner - not a stranger. Sexual assaults occurring on-campus are most likely to occur in the residence halls.

Although the incidence of acquaintance rape is high, there are ways to decrease the risk. These strategies apply to both men and women in the context of any relationship or encounter.

Sex without consent is rape. Make sure you have sober consent for any sexual activity. Consent cannot be given when drunk. If you choose to use alcohol, know your limit and stick to it. Risk for an unwanted sexual experience is increased with the excessive use of alcohol. Go out in groups and return in groups; do not leave friends behind or allow them to wander off with someone they just met.

If you see someone putting themselves at risk or making a poor choice - say something, actively intervene or find someone who will. Do not wait for others to act. It is likely others are having the same thoughts and concerns as you.

If you or someone you know has been the victim of an unwanted sexual experience, talk to someone. Ignoring it will not make it go away. Help is free and confidential. Contact the Sexual Assault Prevention and Survivor Services program in Student Counseling Services at 438-7948 or 438-3566, or visit the website at counseling.ilstu.edu.


The Pedophilic Hypocrisy Of NBC and It's Sponsors

View the article here

This is just sick.  Just goes to show you, anything for money!

09/01/2008

Over the last few days, a certain Ortega taco commercial has been proliferating throughout the Internet. Showcasing the Hamm brothers and Olympic gold medalist Shawn Johnson, the commercial features each athlete lauding the greatness of their particular use of Ortega.

"My taco is the best," boasts a smiling Johnson. "Ortega's taco sauce...It makes my taco pop!"

Apparently, Ortega wants us all to know Shawn, 16, likes her taco stuffed with big, fat double entendres.

As she says these words, she sits between Paul and Morgan Hamm, ending the clip by rolling her eyes suggestively. "Boys, always competing," she says, in a line and setup taken directly from "Two Rods Make It Right" or "Twinsex."

And what is in the background while these three gleefully speak of eating tacos? Young female gymnasts, jumping, twisting, and flying about like forest nymphs.

While every Olympic year comedians, vulgar analysts, and male fans claim a night with underage gymnast x - whether it be Dominique Moceanu, Carly Patterson, or Shawn Johnson - would easily be worth reporting themselves to the Sheriff's office, this Olympics has a dynamic that makes the sexualization of underage female gymnasts a more glaring issue.

Four years ago, just months after the Athens games, NBC television began running segments called To Catch a Predator with stern journalist Chris Hansen. The bit became extremely popular with its tactic of setting-up sting operations that convinced men they were going to have sex with horny and willing teenagers only to confront them and, in many cases, arrest them.

Then, at Beijing, NBC devoted a disproportionally-high amount of coverage to a beautiful gymnast who is underage in most American jurisdictions. Ortega - a commercial sponsor of NBC's - has chosen to put her in a lurid commercial.

Unless Chris Hansen and company show up at corporate headquarters and start arresting men in suits, that's blatant hypocrisy. You simply cannot maintain vegetarian devotion when you put juicy prime rib on a plate.

While Johnson's family and advisers certainly deserve some blame, the executives at NBC must be scorned for simultaneously reaping profits from both sales of the drug and prosecution of the drug-users.

While many locations have ages of consent equal or lower than 16, many do not, and the clear motif of the Predator series was that older men seeking out younger flesh are morally-despicable and deserve to be shamed on national television. Many of the men they targeted were the lowest of the downtrodden: isolated, poor, and desperate men forced to turn to insecure anonymous teenage girls for physical affection, if not emotional. Many probably had legitimate psychological disorders. Still, their profiles linger in police records and on NBC-run websites, forever blemishing them as sex offenders.

Meanwhile, the people exploiting Shawn Johnson's status as a sexual object are white-collared, affluent, and mostly psychologically healthy, not to mention anonymous.

When is Chris Hansen going to show up at his own corporate offices and ask them why they helped pimp a 16-year old?

The producers would probably reply that she became "America's sweetheart," a Midwestern gal who captured the hearts of housewives and grandmothers as if she were they own. While this may be true, overblown publicity of a teenage girl inevitably captures the pants of many men, and in managing that responsibility NBC failed on its part.

I understand that issues of exploitation and sexualization are inevitable in gymnastics until the powers that be establish identical ages of consent and competition minimums across the board.

But in the meantime - while we're stuck with a system that showcases talented 16-year-olds in a society that scorns having sex with them - NBC and its sponsors have a social responsibility to curb the exploitation when the individual is a minor, especially when they've profited so much from catching so-called sexual predators. Giving her disproportional airtime aids the exploitation.

At the very least, Ortega, take the little girls in leotards out of the background!

Otherwise, more and more men are going to find themselves not only wanting to stuff Shawn Johnson's taco, but also finding it morally justifiable given the permissiveness promoted by NBC and its sponsors like Ortega.

As for me, I'm fine with Nastia Liukin and Alicia Sacramone; both, I'm sure, have wonderful tacos. I just don't want to hear about Shawn Johnson's until enjoyment of such would be legal.

I also pray no NBC executives live near any of my succulent underage female relatives.


Political SEX SCANDALS


NC - Ordinance Looks To Ban Sex Offenders from Parks

View the article here

This is just more "feel good" laws, that will do nothing. 90% or more of all sex crimes occur in the family or close friends, this "stranger danger" fear-mongering is just a flat out myth. Expert after expert will tell you that, if the sheeple would stop believing the wolves running the country!
08/31/2008

Greensboro - A proposed ordinance to ban registered sex offenders from Greensboro parks is drawing mixed reviews.

Supporters say the ban will further protect children from predators. Those against it argue the ordinance will lead to unfair profiling and will be nearly impossible to enforce. Sunday, junior league soccer players played for a championship title at Country Park. But the big concern for parents is who came to the field to watch their children play.

"I don't want sex offenders anywhere near my children live or play," said mother Amy Faircloth.
- So you better watch out for your own family and close friends...  Statistically, they are more likely to harm your child than some stranger hiding in the bushes.

City council member Mike Barber proposed an ordinance that would ban sex offenders from being in or around Greensboro parks and recreational facilities.

Barber feels the ban will add additional protection against child predators in public places.

"The state courts say it's constitutional. Therefore it will only give the officers and other law enforcers another tool to protect our community," said Barber.

Those against the ban say it opens innocent bystanders to police scrutiny. Faircloth disagrees.

"It's not unfair profiling. They pass laws against people living in a certain mile radius of schools so what's the difference between a park and a school. Kids come to a park also." Some question how police will enforce the ban. Barber says parents will be responsible for reporting suspicious people to police.

"The ban will give police an opportunity to ask someone what they're doing at the park and if in fact they turn up on the sex offender registry then they'll be in violation of the ordinance," he said.

If the ban passes, sex offenders who violate the ordinance face a $500 fine and up to 30 days in jail.

The council plans to review the proposal on September 16th.

One city already has this ban in place. Kernersville voted in favor of the sex offenders park ban in 2005. Signs are posted at parks including this one at Fourth of July park.


Sex offenders and their wives - Sharing stories, hopes, dreams, problems and obstacles for others who share their life with a convicted sex offender.


Click the image to visit the site